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Stable Canoe Recommendations


ironstone74
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I have a beat up old canoe I use from time to time but it is quiet unstable and I won't take my kids in it again. I'm looking for some input on stable canoes for bumping down the Grand or cruising through small lakes; weight is not a factor. I like the look of Sportpals, any ideas???

 

Thanks

 

Paul

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i think 9 out of 10 if not everybody here will tell you that sportspals are the best, i have never been in one so i have no idea.

 

However, you can also consider building yourself some "stabilizers" like what Cliff (ccmt) did to his.

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Friend had one of those Ram-X Coleman scanoes quite a few years ago with a 2 horse on the back, I felt quite secure in it, don't know if they are still available or how well used ones have stood the test of time, a little heavy though. Could be another possibility.

 

edit : found this link but it is not quite the same, his had a aluminum tube inside down the keel and was green an the inside , the dimensions seem about right, at 43" wide it should be pretty stable but heavy as I said.

 

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=S16M010&categoryid=66001

Edited by dave524
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sportspals are great canoes. They have this foam floats running down each side, and a good shape, which make them very stable.

 

I own a very old aluminum springbok that has a very stable shape to it. The sides bulge out and make it very wide, similar to the effect given by the foam supports on the sportspals.

 

I used to run a 4hp motor off the side of my canoe. I could sit in the canoe sideways, and lean back on the motor with my feet up on the opposite gunwale, and the cane wouldn't come close to tipping.

 

I can pretty well stand up on one gunwale, and the canoe will not flip. It's the most stable canoe I've ever been in. My dad bought it when we lived in Pickle Lake to run the river up there. It's also very long, and good for loading up, or taking the family out in.

 

I'm not saying all springboks are very stable canoes, but this paticular model ranks up there with the best of them.

May 24  weekend 2008 046.jpg

Edited by F-is-H
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Sportspals are lightweight and stable and fairly easy to repair with aluminum sheet and pop rivets. If you hang a motor on them, they're wonderful but if you plan to use paddle power, they're terrible. That's why they build them with oarlocks. I used to build them many years ago. If you enjoy paddling, get a real canoe.

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any boat with a flat bottom will be stable, if you plan on some shallow water and rock sliding on the grand an abs or roylex boat will be best. Read up on initial vs secondary stability and see what is best for your situation. I believe there is a demo day on guelph lake, you can test out a few models to see what you like.

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Sportspals are lightweight and stable and fairly easy to repair with aluminum sheet and pop rivets. If you hang a motor on them, they're wonderful but if you plan to use paddle power, they're terrible. That's why they build them with oarlocks. I used to build them many years ago. If you enjoy paddling, get a real canoe.

I agree with this post, Sportspal are probably the most stable and great for taking out the kids.If your looking for performance and good paddling there the worst. For fishing and such the Sportspals are tough to beat.

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any boat with a flat bottom will be stable, if you plan on some shallow water and rock sliding on the grand an abs or roylex boat will be best. Read up on initial vs secondary stability and see what is best for your situation.

 

I just read up on this. Great advice.. Thanks!

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16 ft Scott canoe Echo model. Bought it 20 + years ago at the Algonquin Outfitters sale in Guelph lake. They have this sale every year, sometimes twice - one inthe spring and one in the fall. We have used it for eveything from interior camping at Lake Superior (weighs 54 lbs) with wife, dog and a weekends worth of groceries, to the often made trip solo down the grand. Can Stand and cast (or drain a coffee), stretch out and flat line, or paddle across a lake in no time at all. AND, if the wife happens to be staring off in the distance and forgets to yell "ROCK"whistling.gif, its pretty good at taking a beating and keep on floating . After all this time solid as the day it came home and handles like a dream

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I've had a 16' Big Chief Canoe for 30 yrs & a 17' Cowan Canoe for 15 yrs love them both had My kids canoeing since they were 2 & 3 yrs old over 20 yrs no problem, try kneeling down it makes most canoes very stable, my daughter started canoeing on her own with a friend at 11 yrs old & that's 14 yrs ago, mostly Saugeen & Maitland River

Richard

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  • 2 years later...

don't buy a sportspal if you plan to do a lot of paddling.

 

great for fishing but not so much for paddling

 

Doing some research on small canoes and came across this thread. A question for those who say the Sportspal doesn't paddle well - How do you mean that? Do you referring to square stern models or all Sportspals? (Square stern canoes all have the same issue of not paddling well).

 

 

 

 

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Doing some research on small canoes and came across this thread. A question for those who say the Sportspal doesn't paddle well - How do you mean that? Do you referring to square stern models or all Sportspals? (Square stern canoes all have the same issue of not paddling well).

 

 

All Sportspals paddle like garbage scows.

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Might be an old thread but still worth updating.

 

Agree about being aware about initial vs secondary stability. I'd go with secondary every time.

 

Flat bottoms, while they may feel very secure to those not super comfortable in canoes, will not have the stability when things get anywhere near rough. It's either stable or not. Rounded v or shallow arched bottoms will feel tippier or less stable initially, but will, when the chips are down, be safer imo (assuming one does not grab the gunwales). It will roll, if you will, with the waves and water whereas a flat bottom will not.

 

Get used to the shallow arch, stay loose in the hips and you won't miss the flat bottom.

 

Also agree with going to demo days to try different canoes and designs.

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If you can find one look for an older scanoe from coleman(ram-x),the ones with the aluminum frame and gunnels. These things are tanks can take a beating are very stable on the water and are great for fishing out of. The downsides are that they are heavy and are not the best for paddling in but they are ok. I have one with 5 hp nissan on the back,but i also use it for just paddling.

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I had heard years ago that the Coleman's were scows so have avoided them. Looking for a 12 ft for my wife to paddle alone. We have a 17 ft Misty River already but too heavy for her to launch by herself.

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