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sneak_e_pete

What would you do?

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Hi all, with the weather being so crappy lately, I seems like it is harder and harder to get a good day to go fishing. I have to plan a day on the water often weeks in advance, so I am forced to take what mother nature dishes out if I want to go fishing. Besides, the weather network is so often wrong. I have stayed home when it called for bad weather and it was fine, and I have gone out when it called for good weather and been dumped on.

 

My question to you....what would you do if you were out on the lake and a thunderstorm rolled in.

 

This has only happened to me once, and unfortuneately, I only had an electric motor and didn't make it back to the launch in time. I had to beach my boat on shore and run up into the forest and lay down flat until it passed. (I know...still not safe, but I figured it was safer than being a lightning rod in a metal boat on the lake). It was a wicked storm.

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Yeah, been there done that!!!

 

4 'whitecaps very close together with extreme wind, rain, lightning, and thunder!!!

 

Headed for the closest shore and tied my boat to an empty dock and crouched amongst a stand of Pines!!!

 

... it'll never happen again!!!

 

The first tiny rumble of distant thunder and I'm off the lake like green jello thru a goose!!!

 

 

Once was enough for me!!! :blink:

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Drove 2.5 hours to Bass lake last year to meet with Rich Nagy, nice weather till I got there, as we were getting ready to go out a storm moved threw so we waited, after it cleared off we thought we try again & another front moved threw, so we waited a while longer, headed out to the west end & started fishing about 1/2 an hour & thunder started but we knew we wouldn't make it back so we headed to the private dock at that end tied up & went & sat under a dining tent till it quit than we headed back out for the rest of the day, it was a little tough fishing after that but we both caught fish & agreed on every thing we did as far as do we fish or quit.

I fish days I can get away so I'll heads to the lake & hope the weather clears usually, rather than stay at home & the weather be wrong & miss out on fishing

Richard

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I've been caught in a couple of major storms while on the water this year...both times in my kayak.

 

The first time, I took cover under a bridge on the Toronto islands for about 15 minutes until it seemed to let up. As I made my way back to Harbourfront, another cell flared up and I got pelted with rain and hail. I took shelter in a small bay on the islands which protected me from the wind. Didn't see any lightning, but heard it in the distance.

 

The second time I was on Restoule Lake in central Ontario. I saw the storm coming down the lake and didn't have time to make it back to the cottage. As it approached me, I beached my kayak and pulled it out of the water. I then took shelter between between some large boulders and counted to myself as the wall of rain moved in. Lots of lightning and thunder that time, some of it very close.

 

After these experiences, I've learned to recognize the warning signs of major storms...the black fingers of hell reaching down from the clouds, a tower of puffy clouds that builds high into the sky, and finally the absolute calm before the storm.

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Yea first sign of thunder i head to the nearest dock or shore line away from the wind blowin point. I always carry a brand new tarp that's visible with me so when i'm on shore i can throw it over us and everyone else.

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anyone from north bay will remember the storm in july of 2006. blew down millions of trees, i had to bail in a boat house on nipissing. I guess i picked the right one cause a few cottages over one boathouse got knocked over. By far the most scared I have ever been!

 

Cheers!

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its happened to me more than i care to admit ...the fury of mother nature is one thing but the fury of my wife for doing what i do is no comparison to the elements...so i now "TRY" to lean to the diligent side of safety ..( that means phone on a regular basis to ensure her im ok and hunkered down in a bay or river if i cant make it back to port

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Happened to me on Rice Lake while fishing a Top Bass tournament in the 90's. We were headed up the Otanabee when all heck broke loose. I can remember the fishing line hanging in the air on each cast with the buildup of static in the air. My rod was actually buzzing. We knew we had to hightail it to cover.

The storm clouds were so low they looked like they were at tree top level/ Temp must have dropped 10 degrees in 15 minutes. We pulled into a marina/lodge dock and watched one of the most amazing lightening storms I've ever seen. One blast hit directly across the river from us. The thunder was deafening and made my ears ring for a few minutes.

In 15-30 minutes it was all over.

 

The storm through Oakville last night reminded me of that day on Rice

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Funny, we were just having this conversation the other day. We were out on Lake Ontario two weeks ago and saw a storm coming towards us. We decided to leave and just made it back to the launch just as the wind picked up and the lightning started striking. But at the same time, we saw a few sailboats still out on the lake looking like they were still heading out and not in. Obviously that is not a smart thing to do - especially with their long mast. Or do they have something that protects them from the strike - like being able to ground the lightning some how if they were struck?

 

Also what happens at sea when a big ship/tanker gets struck by lightning - I would assume that happens more regularly? Is there anything that protects them from a strike? Or do they just hope they don;t get hit?

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Me and my buddies did what you absolutely shouldn't do. WOT to the cottage dock. Labatt Blue was calling from a distance and we had to see what she wanted without delay :lol:.

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Funny, we were just having this conversation the other day. We were out on Lake Ontario two weeks ago and saw a storm coming towards us. We decided to leave and just made it back to the launch just as the wind picked up and the lightning started striking. But at the same time, we saw a few sailboats still out on the lake looking like they were still heading out and not in. Obviously that is not a smart thing to do - especially with their long mast. Or do they have something that protects them from the strike - like being able to ground the lightning some how if they were struck?

 

Also what happens at sea when a big ship/tanker gets struck by lightning - I would assume that happens more regularly? Is there anything that protects them from a strike? Or do they just hope they don;t get hit?

 

Most sail boats and larger boats have a grounding rod that pushes the hit into the water. I have been out in all sorts of storms on a sail boat where going to "shore" is not really an option.

 

~ I think I must have been a few min ahead of you at bronte, that was a great storm. When I hear the thunder I leave the water no matter how far away it seems as it can travel fast.

 

Mother Nature can be a mean BiT$CH when she wants to be don't temp it

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Most sail boats and larger boats have a grounding rod that pushes the hit into the water. I have been out in all sorts of storms on a sail boat where going to "shore" is not really an option.

 

~ I think I must have been a few min ahead of you at bronte, that was a great storm. When I hear the thunder I leave the water no matter how far away it seems as it can travel fast.

 

Mother Nature can be a mean BiT$CH when she wants to be don't temp it

 

 

Thanks for the info...learn something every day. We were off of Port Credit so the storm may have hit you first but it was coming from a Northerly West direction so it wasn't too far behind.

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Was out in a bass tourney this past Sunday on the Bay of Quinte when the a big storm blew right at us...we pulled into a dock and tied up to wait it out. My partner is deathly afraid of lightening storms...I'm not but the tourney rules are at least 1 person has to stay in the boat...not sure if they apply when a storm blows in but would think so.

 

I have been in a boat when the rods sound like cicada's from electricty and jigging makes your rod hum....what a scary and yet cool time.

 

Cheers

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I was up in GBay this weekend, and the weather seemed to change every hour. We went out for a bit last night, in total calm, rare for there, but before another storm, of course. My pal's boat is aluminum, which had no small bearing on that fact that when the thunder got close, we bailed for the cottage, driving close to shore when we could.

My brother-in-law had a friend struck by lightning in a tin boat many years ago, apparently, there wasn't much left of him or the boat.

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even a remote threat and I get the heck out of there. Twice I couldn't make it back to the launch due to waves. Once, crawled up under somebody's cottage, the other time I tied off to a small rock island and got pelted by rain and wind but thankfully nothing else

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