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More 12 ft. Aluminum questions... lifejackets, safety equipment, ect.

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Long read... apologize in advance.

 

Ok, so I know there are some other things I need for this boat, which I wasn't really thinking when I bought it (not that it mattered). I'm just used to using someone else's boat and not being responsible for the little things since they are already there.

 

I'm cheap, so the boat was cheap and I want the equipment to be cheap, I can't help it.

 

Have a couple more questions for those of you experienced in the ways of small fishing boats....

 

Life Jackets

I know I have to have one per passenger in the boat, the question is, does type of lifejacket really matter? I saw on Wal-Mart's website they have the generic 'keyhole' life jackets for like $9 or something. Seems like a good deal but this isn't an area where i want to be so cheap its not safe. The zipper jackets seem like overkill

 

Do those of you using boats this small (12 ft. 3HP) really wear your life jackets on the water, or just have them for safety's sake?

 

Oars

I was going to get a set of Oars and oar locks just in case. I plan on doing some solo fishing in this boat and figured this makes sense. Is this overkill? I just think it would suck to get out in the middle of any lake and have the motor die and have one paddle to get me back to the truck.

 

Is $30/ ea. the cheapest Oars around? (CDN Tire)

 

What Else do I need?

 

Trying to make this as painless as possible, nothing worse than not having something out on the water.

 

I know I need a bailing device, whistle and whatever comes in that kit at Canadian Tire for 9.99...

 

I need an anchor and some rope obviously.

 

Anything else I need to have in the boat?

 

What sort of waterproof box or containers do you keep on your boat for wallets and cell phones? I don't usually even take them, just curious...

 

Bare bones operation for me, just want to get out on water and fish, but need to make sure I'm prepared.

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sounds like you have everything you need...I keep my wallet and keys in a dry bag...pretty cheap and a good one will hold air so blow it up a bit and it floats...we generally sit on our jackets but being a swim instructor most of my teen years pretty confident on the water...if your not wear them...you can get zipper jackets for about 20 a piece if you look around...now get out on the water so we can see some pics!!!!!

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I always wear my life jacket, even in a 12 footer....not worth the chance. If you get a comfortable zipper one (and as mentioned above, they can be found cheap), you won't mind wearing it all day. Mine is light weight and gives me full range of motion...very comfortable. Got it at CT for $30.00.

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You forgot the bouyant heaving line.

Just buy one of these at Canadian tire for $9.99 and you will have heaving line, whistle, flashlight and bailing bucket.

The key hole pfd's are legal just uncomfortable if you are wearing them.

I have one of the inflatable pfd's I wear when floating the rivers and when running from spot to spot in the boat.

While spendy, I don't even realize I'm wearing it and if you aren't wearing it it's not really doing it's job is it. B)

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I'm with you on the oars, 1 is useless. It's especially useless if you have 2 ppl in the boat, you're simply not going to be able to paddle against strong wind (have tried).

 

I suggest 2 oars without a doubt, and if you do get stuck with a friend the two of you can easily row back.

Edited by Governator

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Oars in oarlocks are handy for trolling really slowly too.

And the oar being way longer then a paddle you can pole yourself in the shallow weeds too.

 

Its a good idea to wear a life jacket

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You are required to have oars or paddles in the boat. Oars are a better choice than paddles, although both are safety-legal. If your motor conks out, you'll get tired really quick with a set of paddles and they won't get you far.

 

If you and your passenger(s) are good swimmers, you don't need to wear the lifejackets. A 3 HP isn't going to get you in trouble (i.e. hitting a deadhead and upsetting). But the zipper-type are worth the few extra bucks anyway.

 

Anchor and 30 ft of rope are required.

 

For stuff you need to keep waterproof (camera, wallet, etc.), Ziploc freezer bags are great and they'll float if you zip them shut with lots of air in them.

 

Bailing bucket, flashlight and Fox 40 whistle are all required. A gym-type whistle with a ball in it is not legal.

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check the transport canada website for req'd equipment, and maybe grab the safe boating guide.

 

.

Edited by smally21

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get one of the canadian tire boating safety kits... make sure to put batteries in the flashlight, ive heard of people just tossing it in their boats and getting fined when they get stopped for no signalling device (which i believe you're required to have)

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I think you also require some kind of running lights if travelling 1 hour before / after sunset or sunrise I may be wrong. There are portable clamp on lights that run off batteries you need a bow light red/green and a white stern running light.

 

kawartha Kev

Edited by Kawartha Kev

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Use a milk-bag jug for a bailer. Dollar store for ropes. Ethafoam for a seat cushion.

Wooden oars, not aluminum.

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I think you also require some kind of running lights if travelling 1 hour before / after sunset or sunrise I may be wrong. There are portable clamp on lights that run off batteries you need a bow light (white) and a red/green stern running light.

 

Actually red/green at the bow and white at the stern.

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To meet the safety requirements the anchor rode should add up to 50' but the more the better.

 

I think Kev boats better than he types , red -green light on front all around white on stern.

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The "keyhole" LIFEJACKETS are actually safer than 99% of the PFD's out there, there is a big difference between an approved life jacket & PFD. Though 99% of the time people with the lifejackets don't wear them.

 

Here is probably the best site out there for all your Canadian boating questions.

http://boating.ncf.ca/

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To meet the safety requirements the anchor rode should add up to 50' but the more the better.

 

I think Kev boats better than he types , red -green light on front all around white on stern.

 

 

My bad Polliwog mixed up bow and stern. Thanks. I have a small 12ft aluminum and use the portable running lights although I am one of the few I have seen with them most small boats don't bother they should nothing like almost being run over by a big boat in the dark.

 

Kawartha Kev

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I think Clofchik is right. A proper lifejacket is supposed to float you "right-side-up" and hold your face (nose and mouth) out of the water even if you are unconscious.

 

The fancy PFD vests (zip-up type) will not necessarily do that. The keyhole will.

 

Kid's life jackets have a flotation collar on them to keep the face out of the water.

 

When I was a kid, my lifejacket was filled with kapok, a fiber that would lose its buoyancy if it got wet, so it was enclosed in a rubber bladder. There was no such thing as closed-cell foam back then. My parents wore (only in rough conditions) air force surplus life jackets that had a long tube on them so you could blow them up with your mouth even when you had them on. They folded completely flat when not in use. All our jackets would hold your head out of the water if you let yourself go limp.

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The most likely event where your going to need a life jacket/pfd in a 12 footer isn't going to be the boat sinking out from under you its going to be you falling out of the boat so it might be a good idea to get something comfortable and wear it. Eventually your going to see wearing them being mandatory in small craft so you may as well get something comfortable.

 

Tip: although the capacity plate may say 4 persons they cannot all take a whiz off the back of the boat at the same time! Don't ask.

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Hahahahahahah.

 

 

The most likely event where your going to need a life jacket/pfd in a 12 footer isn't going to be the boat sinking out from under you its going to be you falling out of the boat so it might be a good idea to get something comfortable and wear it. Eventually your going to see wearing them being mandatory in small craft so you may as well get something comfortable.

 

Tip: although the capacity plate may say 4 persons they cannot all take a whiz off the back of the boat at the same time! Don't ask.

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