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kickingfrog

Winter boots tested

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Was just talking to a friend of mine who works for a hospital where they were testing winter boots in which they were using glass in the soles for traction. He said they will likely be coming out in the market soon.

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They use walnut shells in winter tires.

well thats nuts

 

well nut shells anyways lol

never knew that

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Ice is one thing for poor traction.... Water covered smooth tile floors from melting slush in malls and stores to me are about 3 to 5 times more slippery. This is just a personal observation from delivering to malls and restaurants 6 days a week for 14 yrs.

 

The worst part I found was boot or shoes that offer great traction on ice or snow covered ice for that matter were totally useless once you enter an establishment with tiled floors that have no texture. Those Mark work tarantula were the worst for me.

 

Just as bad though was I couldn't ever find a shoe or boot that was slip resistant indoors for slippery restaurant floors that worked well outside on ice and snow covered ice....

 

Can't wait to see the data when they test for slush covered floors LOL.

Edited by Canuck2fan

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well thats nuts

 

well nut shells anyways lol

never knew that

 

I own toyo winter with the supposed walnut shells in them. They sure are loud!! Cant speak for walnut shell traction since I haven't tried any other brand on the same vehicle yet to compare lol.

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Ice is one thing for poor traction.... Water covered smooth tile floors from melting slush in malls and stores to me are about 3 to 5 times more slippery. This is just a personal observation from delivering to malls and restaurants 6 days a week for 14 yrs.

 

The worst part I found was boot or shoes that offer great traction on ice or snow covered ice for that matter were totally useless once you enter an establishment with tiled floors that have no texture. Those Mark work tarantula were the worst for me.

 

Just as bad though was I couldn't ever find a shoe or boot that was slip resistant indoors for slippery restaurant floors that worked well outside on ice and snow covered ice....

 

Can't wait to see the data when they test for slush covered floors LOL.

 

 

Some floor cleaners mix badly with icemelter/salt and make some floors slicker than snail snot.

Edited by kickingfrog

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Ice is one thing for poor traction.... Water covered smooth tile floors from melting slush in malls and stores to me are about 3 to 5 times more slippery. This is just a personal observation from delivering to malls and restaurants 6 days a week for 14 yrs.

 

The worst part I found was boot or shoes that offer great traction on ice or snow covered ice for that matter were totally useless once you enter an establishment with tiled floors that have no texture. Those Mark work tarantula were the worst for me.

 

Just as bad though was I couldn't ever find a shoe or boot that was slip resistant indoors for slippery restaurant floors that worked well outside on ice and snow covered ice....

 

Can't wait to see the data when they test for slush covered floors LOL.

 

The problem with restaurant floors is no matter how clean it looks it has a thin film of oil/grease from cooking with the fryers.

Any kind of moisture on your shoes or the floor and it's like having Teflon soled shoes on at the rink!!!

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