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bushart

Fly-Rod Question

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I would like to buy my son (20 yrs old-so not a kid) a fly rod outfit for Christmas.

 

He loves Steelhead/Salmon but also chases smallies--Can anyone recommend a weight-length line types and reel suggestions that may cover these species.

 

Thanks

 

Bushart

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You might want to look at a 9 ft. 7 or 8 weight. Four piece rods are very popular, given their ability to travel more efficiently, and with improved ferrule systems over years past. If it is his first rod, a few casting lessons would help (by a real instructor....not some schmuck like me). Odds are he would find a rod with a bit of backbone easier to learn with, as the softer feeling rods take some time to enjoy. Just a few thoughts.

 

outdoorguy61

Edited by outdoorguy61

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....That's kind of a tough bill to fill with one rod but like outdoorguy61 said I'd go 9' but I'd likley go 8 or even 9 weight, especially if he would like to cast big bulky topwater flies for the smallmouth. A 9 weight should also be able to tame the toughest steelhead/salmon and I'd stick with a 2 piece no doubt about it.

 

Reels can go from the bargain bin variety to the break the bank account variety. I'd reccomend you don't scrimp too much and be certain it's rated for the line size (and sufficient backing) you buy. Another option is to buy one with interchangable spools for the different lines he may purchase (ie: floating, sinking,a etc.). For a beginner a floating line is a good start. You might consider a cheap level line at this time as it's likely to get destroyed. Then when he becomes more proficient he/you can purchase a quality line in a weight forward or shooting head for punching out those long casts.

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IMO an 8wt in a med-fast action would be ideal. Reels have come down in price so much that you can get a decent reel for around $100 with a disc drag and anodized for saltwater use. I usually match the line to the rod rating (8wt rod w/ 8wt line). A Spiel mentioned, a floating line is easier to cast for beginners.

 

As for tackle recommendations, it really depends on how much you're willing to spend. As Outdoorguy61 mentioned, budget some funds for a good instructor...It really speeds up the learning curve.

Edited by MJL

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I think I might actually be able to contribute to this thread! hehe I was flyfishing with my boyfriend last september and he caught a nice salmon on an 8wt fly rod, he uses a flueger (sp?) reel I'm pretty sure.. and he prefers sage rods but basic ones are still good. He always wants the 3 or 4 piece rods for convenience as well. I can't remember how long that one is (he has a bunch of fly rods) but I think it's about 8ft. For line I hear the braided line is really good. If your son goes for the big fish I'd recommend a 7-8+wt rod. If he prefers the rivers/medium fish a basic safe rod is 5-6wt. where I like the 3-5 wts for the trout and small guys :).

 

The bass pro shop in Vaughan is pretty good for questions and advice as well! If your in the area at least.

 

edit: here's a picture of the salmon he caught, he had to chase it down the river for almost 20mins, it was too funny.

september2006ganaraskarpu7.jpg

Edited by Lyra

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where do you live? Lot's of dedicated stores that would be able to set you up. I think of TroutFitters in Fergus specifically. A nice deal that we have done there is to get the giftee a guide and a gift certificate. That way they can go to the store, meet the guide and get a feel for some equipment and then invest in something that will fit his/her needs.

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9' Fenwick HMX 8wt rod/reel combo at LeBaron's.

Scientific Anglers ULTRA 4 flyline WF8F

Dacron backing line.

All for about $225!

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So... I would probably recommend an 8wt 9ft rod... This will be enough to bring in steelhead and salmon and of course the bass as well... I would say a 3 piece is reasonable because 3ft sections are not too bad to carry around and 3 pieces wont ruin the action... Line, well I would say a Weight forward line to match the reel and rod (8wt rod/8wt reel/8wt line) which would be floating... This would allow large bass flies to be casted as well as egg patterns and all the associated salmon/steel stuff too. You can get rods and reels in almost any budget but you want to make sure blank and drag quality is good... Hope this puts you on your way a little farther

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Thanks Again to All.

 

One dumb question from an old spinning fisherman---Can you spool these reels incorrect and what does a weight forward line do for you---can they also be floating?

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Weight forward lines can be floating. In fact, it is one of the best choices for large bass flies. The downside of a weight forward line is that it doesn't roll-cast as well as a double taper line. Definitly budget for at least one lesson and don't scrimp on the line: it's probably more important than the rod, and definitly more important than the reel. 9' 8 wt would be a good bet for the fish you describe.

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I would also recommend a 9 weight line and 9 foot rod combination. I have a 7 - 8 weight outfit and have trouble casting out large flies for pike (no bass up here). I also recommend a fly reel with a large arbour. Okuma reels seem to have the favour on sites where there are comparison tests. For the line, it would be a weight forward floating line of the highest quality. I haven't bought any lines in the past few years, but in those days, I tried a Cortland 444 and found it too soft and sticky. I like the Scientific lines a lot.

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