Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
icefisherman

Umbilical cord blood stem cells - (NF)

Recommended Posts

Well,

As some of you know we are expecting second child soon.

Didn't do it for the first one, but am seriously considering this option for the second one.

Wondering if any of you have gone down this path and could share experience/opinion on it?

It is quite pricey but maybe good insurance policy for the future?

 

Here is a short list of places in Canada that do this kind of stuff:

http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/u...istcanada.shtml

 

Cheers,

Ice Fisherman

Edited by icefisherman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did this with Insception Bio. An insurance policy is exactly how we looked at it. It's something we're doing in the hopes that we will never need to take advantage of it and if it never is required, it will be money well spent. :)

 

Charles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The blood from the umbilical cord contains stem cells. These cells can be used to treat many potentially lethal illnesses and can be used in place of a bone marrow transplant. Parents sometimes save these just in case something befalls their child and they need this type of remedy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When your baby is born, the blood contained in the umbilical cord (maybe placenta too, I don't know) is full of stem cells. These are the most basic and versatile of human cells, and can be used to treat a whole bunch of ills since they can change to be anything from bone marrow to liver cells. They are genetically suited to help your new baby or even other family members recover from things like radiation treatment for cancer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×