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dannyboy

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About dannyboy

  • Rank
    Almost a Guide
  • Birthday 03/22/1965

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wellandport, ON
  1. We used tung oil on our first set of gunwales and it was stored right side up in the roof of the garage, they also turned black like you mentioned. On the replacement set I used marine spar varnish (Epiphanes) I scuff and add a new coat each year and so far after 3 years they still look good. Dan
  2. We had the the same problem with dry rot and a seat collapsing, when I pulled the gunwales off I found the dry rot was considerable. It took about 12 hours to replace them in our Bluewater canoe, starting with rough boards - jointing, planeing, sizing, splicing, routing, sanding, finishing and installing. I like wood and working with wood, but if I had to do it again I would go with aluminum gunwales for the less maintenance factor, after 20 years a $350 investment is not bad especially when you figure the new Kevlars go for around $3000. Dan
  3. What Wayne said - remove rivets, reseal the joints and replace the rivets - if you need help to either buck or drive rivets let me know; us rotor wing mechanics work for beer rather than money. Dan
  4. All the best to you and your family Wayne - you could certainly use a break but Jen doesn't sit around and feel sorry for herself; certainly an incredible woman. Dan
  5. This part is the race: It should be replaced when you replace the bearing and it sits inside the hub, usually pressed in. Dan
  6. I'd say Heinz but Occam's razor says its a Shepherd crossed with Lab. Dan
  7. Yes I stayed up and watched the landing - amazing technology, I am glad the USA believes in doing things like this. Dan
  8. With the smoker full it will take longer to get up to temperature so leave some extra time. Make sure the heat can circulate so you don't get any cool spots. Rolling the ribs can help to fit more in the smoker: Dan
  9. Peak vice is a good value, $150 new for the rotary. Dan
  10. If Lake Erie is up the launch at Port Maitland can be difficult, you can launch at Fishmaster's just outside Dunnville it used to be $5 with parking - they will be able to put you on fish in the river or the lake if it turns out decent. Dan
  11. I used Icky Fly Works before I started tying, Free shipping for orders over $30 and $1 per fly on average seemed decent. Dan
  12. Butterfly stitches (Steri-strips) are better than crazy glue (and hurt much less when a real Dr has to tear the glue off to correctly stitch you up) and much more hygienic than do-it-yourself stitches. Dan
  13. Lots of great info here, a waterproof portage type pack is a good thing to have: Keeps your gear dry, they normally float and make life easy. Mountaineering type packs that are tall and skinny with stuff tied on the outside are a pain, fumbling with several items like paddles, fishing rods, sleeping bags in garbage bags and so on looses its appeal after the first portage. Clipping your PFD to the stern seat when you portage keeps the canoe nose up. Don't bother with a saw or axe, you can always collect enough firewood from beaver dams or along the shore. Double check when you are leaving a portage for gear, after a couple portages someone generally forgets a paddle leaned against a tree or sunglasses on a rock after a meal. Water is heavy bring a filter/purifier system if the water is not safe. A can of beans weighs a pound, we figure a pound of food per person per day (three meals), but don't bother with the expensive dehydrated stuff you see at camping stores. There is a good selection of single pot meals at you local supermarket where you just add water and cook - noodles, rice, curries, scalloped potatoes and so on that are great for meals and are light to carry. Dan
  14. 2 cans bans your choice - I like to mix black and kidney 2 cans Tomatoes 1/3 lb. smoked pork - strips bacon, pork hock, ham 1 onion 3-4 garlic cloves 2 split and seeded jalapeño or serrano peppers 3/4 cup of your favorite BBQ sauce 1 Tbsp. dry mustard 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 Tbsp. chili powder salt and pepper to taste Sauté onions and garlic in heavy dutch oven, add everything else and place the dutch oven in a smoker with lid off for at least 2 hours at 200F. You can also go indirect on a gas grill using a smoke box. If they start to dry out add a bit of beer or water to keep them liquid. If using pork hocks remove and debone when cooked and add the meat back into the beans. If you're feeding women, children, or Liberals you can use only half of the hot peppers. Dan
  15. You need the Landowner to give you permission for access and hunting. Dan
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