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I've always let the dealership do my maintenance at the end of the year. Instead of spending the extra money I decided I'll be the one to do my winterizing. I drained my gear oil today and noticed some faint white streaks. I was wondering if I should be concerned? It's a 2019 300 etec. I jumped a stump a couple weeks ago and had a bit of skeg damage, no damage to gear case or prop. For those of you that are familiar with annual maintenance I'm sure you've seen what water intrusion looks like. Thanks!

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Edited by b_cdot
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Creamy white streaks is the beginning of water intrusion into the lower gearcase.  Without seeing it up close, you may have done some unseen damage, or maybe caught some fishing line around the shaft in front of the prop.  That will damage the rear seal rather quick. 

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16 minutes ago, Fisherman said:

Creamy white streaks is the beginning of water intrusion into the lower gearcase.  Without seeing it up close, you may have done some unseen damage, or maybe caught some fishing line around the shaft in front of the prop.  That will damage the rear seal rather quick. 

Thanks, took prop off today and nothing abnormal. Does gear case need to be empty to perform a pressure test? Might have to bring it into dealer

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7 hours ago, b_cdot said:

Does gear case need to be empty to perform a pressure test?

No it doesn't, at times it makes it easier to find a potential leak. It's easier to see liquid seeping rather then air. I've converted one of my rad pressure testers with a hollow screw to pressurize lower units. I have also found that pressurizing the case doesn't always show you a leak. A worn seal for example (if not torn to shreds) may not leak while under pressure. When checking for a leak I also will fill the case with a Varsol cleaner. Chemically it won't hurt anything, it will clean out the inside of the case and then evaporate; if left open to the air, once drained out. 

What I do when seeing milkshake coming out of the case; is put the plug back in and pressure test. If nothing is found, drain the case and flush with varsol. Fill case with varsol, run the engine in gear of a minute or so and drain. Repeat as many times as it takes to get clear fluid draining out. The varsol has enough lubricating ability to not hurt anything, in a no load condition. After the last fill with vaesol, clean up the mess and walk away for the night. The next time out to have a look, check if there's any varsol drips and where they're coming from. 

Yeah I know most already know this; just putting it out there.

Dan.        

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