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How to choose braided line.


Justin C
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Hello there 

I am wondering how to choose the type of braided fishing line. I want 50lb test braided line. But i know that there are different types of braided line. There is a kind of line that is fluorocarbon coated and it is suppose to be stiffer than braid that does not have this. So overall i am just wondering how to choose this. Please tell me what kind of braided line that you use.

Thank you

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 What will you be fishing for and where will you be fishing? What kind of reel will you be using? Will you be using a leader or not? Some of the brands have a coating which make attaching leaders problematical. Casting, Jigging or Trolling, or all of these? How much do you want to spend? 

I consider these things when buying braid. Maybe elaborate on some of these points to help us give you some suggestions. You will get a lot of replies on this topic and there are a lot of folk that are into the whole Chevy/Ford type of argument /brand loyalty thing. I would say that all the brands have good products and bad products. Sometimes the product is actually good its just the wrong application that makes it seem like junk.....lol.....and sometimes its just junk.....NANOFIL!......lol. 

Edited by limeyangler
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Personally, have not used any bad braid! Are some better than others, sure but generally not a night & day difference. The best value out there as far as I'm concerned is either the Daiwa J Braid or Yo-Zuri braid, both "Made in Japan" products.

Great tip from BassMan11 about the mono backing and if you're spooling it up on a spinning reel do not spool up with all braid and attached it with an arbor knot!

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As previously mentioned, your application would help us with a recommendation. Also, as previously mentioned there's really no 'bad braid" out there. The only one I really didn't like was PP super slick as I found it would dig in on the spool which made casting problematic.

Generally, I use plain old Power Pro Green (spectra) for everything from Bass to Muskie. Its the benchmark/industry standard braid and can usually be found on sale.  Also, the mono backing idea is a great way to save a few $$.  Another option is that you put on a full spool of braid and after a few seasons you run it off onto another reel so the unused portion is now on the outside of the spool.  For mono backing,  Berkley big game is an economic choice.

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I tried Power Pro on an older Shimano spinning reel 2500. I had problems with the line nesting into itself if it was retrieved with tension making the first cast or two after landing a fish difficult.  The line would also frequently slide off in a a large bunch of coils. I'm thinking the reel is the problem more than the line.

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I use straight up Power Pro.

Super slick seems to cast a bit further but does not cut through vegetation like the regular stuff does. The new V2 line is supposed to be a good compromise between the original super slick and the original power pro.

I have tried a couple different braids and have always come back to power pro. Jbraid does get good reviews but I have never tried it so can't comment. Suffix 832 is a little louder than other braids but does a very good job as well.

 

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Long ago I tried the original spider wire, it's been like 20-25 years ago, maybe more? Wasn't happy with it at all, and went back to mono, but I am guessing it has improved with time.

I put 65# test on a couple of abu c4 reels, and used 17# test stren for backing, those reels would hold a lot of line and I didn't feel that more than 80 yards or so was needed. Watch your knots if you do, my first couple of uni knots were terrible, I could pull the knots apart.

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I agree with Davids comment  that their are many choices of Braid to choose from  but at the end of the day the difference between them is not  night and day. This is even more true when it comes to using braid on a baitcasting reel. Day in day out original Power Pro is a excellent choice.

When considering braid for a spinning reel is when I have notice the characteristics of  braid to come more into play. This especially true when the choice goes  to braids with extra small diameter such as Seaguars Smackdown and the extra casting difference gained . However this extra benefit comes at a price. Great line but its not cheap.

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1 hour ago, Justin C said:

Ok thanks guys any of you ever used spiderwire. And also do any of you put mono backing to save money on braid.

Thanks

seems like the consensus, me included, is original power pro with mono backing

I think all this chat might be a waste of time because a cheap baitcaster just won't work well, period

IMO you've gotta spend $200 plus for a baitcaster or don't even bother, I'd say look for a Curado, new or used

 

 

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, chris.brock said:

seems like the consensus, me included, is original power pro with mono backing

I think all this chat might be a waste of time because a cheap baitcaster just won't work well, period

IMO you've gotta spend $200 plus for a baitcaster or don't even bother, I'd say look for a Curado, new or used

 

 

That's a good point. Baitcasters are many times more complex than spinning reels which means you have to spend a bit more to get something in the middle of the bell curve. Curado yes, Tatula yes... I have a Tatula type R that I just love and it works in all kinds of senarios (and looks better doing it than the shimano...lol).

Edited by KraTToR
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I am not a bass fisherman per se but do target them sometimes and get incidental catches too, I'm just wondering why 50lb braid is necessary...is it because of weeds or something? My reels have 10lb brain on and never had an issue, I use a spinning reel though, just wondering why such a heavy line.

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3 hours ago, limeyangler said:

I am not a bass fisherman per se but do target them sometimes and get incidental catches too, I'm just wondering why 50lb braid is necessary...is it because of weeds or something? My reels have 10lb brain on and never had an issue, I use a spinning reel though, just wondering why such a heavy line.

LOL, ever watch bassmasters? it's really unacceptable to lose a 100,000 dollar fish to a broken line! Weeds, wood, zebra mussels all play a part in it here, one of my brothers lost a bass around 7 # because it swam thru a half submerged cement truck tire at a pond we used to fish, two pieces of cover in that pond, two tires and you had stop or turn a bigger bass before they could get to them.

I could fish the open waters of Lake Erie with no junk around for smallies and walleye and be perfectly content using 10# mono, there just wasn't much if anything they could get into, although the zebra mussels did mean you had to check your line for nicks frequently. When you got into the back bays of Lake Erie and the inland lakes with trees in the water, flipping docks, lilies, weeds there was just so much more for them to swim into, and given half a chance they will!

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3 hours ago, OhioFisherman said:

LOL, ever watch bassmasters? it's really unacceptable to lose a 100,000 dollar fish to a broken line! Weeds, wood, zebra mussels all play a part in it here, one of my brothers lost a bass around 7 # because it swam thru a half submerged cement truck tire at a pond we used to fish, two pieces of cover in that pond, two tires and you had stop or turn a bigger bass before they could get to them.

I could fish the open waters of Lake Erie with no junk around for smallies and walleye and be perfectly content using 10# mono, there just wasn't much if anything they could get into, although the zebra mussels did mean you had to check your line for nicks frequently. When you got into the back bays of Lake Erie and the inland lakes with trees in the water, flipping docks, lilies, weeds there was just so much more for them to swim into, and given half a chance they will!

LOL...NOOOOO! I have no interest in most TV fishing shows. Somehow I don't think the OP is going to run into financial problems if his line snaps other than the odd pricey bass lure. I kind of figured it was because of snags or something, but so far have not heard from him why he is going with that test line. There are some good, and relatively cheap, abrasion resistant lines out there. I bought some Tuff Line XP last year to try and beat the coral in Antigua while not compromising casting distance due to the ever present 30kmh+ Easterly wind. It cast just as far as the Power Pro Super 8 and held up way better when rubbing on coral.  I had a couple fish take me right into the coral and under rock/coral shelves and I still landed them. Trial and error finding something that suits you, all the braids are good and bad, but if you are unfamiliar with using braid might be a good idea to try a couple different ones so you know what properties each one has and which of those properties works for you and go from there.

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21 hours ago, Justin C said:

Ok thanks guys any of you ever used spiderwire. And also do any of you put mono backing to save money on braid.

Thanks

Havent used spiderwire in a long time.  Power pro just works so I stick with it.  On a lot of spinning reels and some casting I put mono backing.  On trolling reels I only put enough mono to prevent spool slip.  Also, tough line like Limey mentioned is really good stuff.  It used to be easy to fine at Lebaron way back but then disappeared from shelves here.   I still have on casting rig with a spool of tough line that has been reversed once, had a few feet cut off here and there but still going strong probably 12 years later.  I use fluorocarbon lead.

Edited by porkpie
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All braid is pretty much the same (not to be confused with the fused superlines, like Fireline), with one exception, the number of strands used. The reason this is an important distinguishing feature is that the more strands the rounder the line. This equates to the line being more supple. It also creates less noise and resistance. Probably increases casting distance as well. However, for me, this also brings the issue of rod wrap. If you are doing anything that requires you to impart action on the bait with your rod, I find the braids with larger numbers of strands have a greater chance of rod-tip wrap, which can be really annoying.

That being said, I still use the aforementioned Daiwa J-Braid and Yo-Zuri as they are usually the best price and are great lines. They are also very round, so for jigging and jerkbaits, I prefer standard Power-pro.

As for "expensive" baitcaster, that has nothing to do with braid. It is simply the inexpensive baitcasters just don't hold up over time when you are doing anything that puts a lot of resistance at the end of the line. Bass fishing tends to do that, fishing big plastics or ripping through thick weeds. Braid has no stretch either. Having a long rod can help re-direct some of that force though, but ultimately I think without good gears and drag system, the reel will fail sooner than it should.

Of course, you always have to be reasonable. Get what you can afford and always consider the used market. A decent baitcaster can last a lifetime if taken care of, so buying used isn't a bad idea. Check out some of the reviews by Tackle Advisors on Youtube. He does some pretty involved testing of reels, including entry-level baitcasters.

Good luck!

Edited by adempsey
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 I think the OP needs a 7ft medium power spinning rod, 15lb braid, 2500 series reel and perhaps some 8-15lb flouro leads.   I doubt he'll be punching thick matts with a pool cue rod and 2oz jigs.   Figuring out where'/when/how you're going to fish will have a huge impact on the tackle/equipment you'll be using.   

Edited by BillM
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Adam, my point is, put whatever line you want on a cheap bait caster, it's not going to work well with any line    

The op said he had low end reel so all this discussion of line and backing is pretty much a waste of time'

I've tried and owned low end bait casters, money down the toilet. I'm a Shimano guy and I think a Curado is the starting point for a bait caster, that said, the Curado is still an awesome piece of machinery that could keep someone happy for a life time.

 

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