Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
super dave

Transom repair. Type of wood

Recommended Posts

I recently purchased my first boat. Older 14 aluminum. Got it home on Thanksgiving weekend and noticed that the transom is pretty old and will need replacing. It's something I'm willing to tackle myself. I have a big cherry board sitting in the garage. Is this something I can use instead of marine grade Plywood? What do you guys use to seal the Wood? I've read of epoxy, Thompson water sale, spar varnish or just plain paint. What would be the best Option?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just used good one side 3/4 PL premium to adhere them together added screws put it back in the boat.

Then drilled all mount ,brace and drain holes.

Took it back out sealed it all with west epoxy and painted it with marine paint..I'll never have to worry about it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As above. But I like the look of wood so I would use a few coats of Marine grade Spar Varnish on the Cherry. The more Spar applied the darker it will get. A light sanding and a good cleaning with a Tack cloth and repeat.

 

I can't see why Cherry wood would not work as long as it is thick enough, and varnishing it would look amazing. If it is plywood with a veneer that won't work for me, then I would go with Marine grade plywood, you might not need a full sheet either if they will cut. If solid Cherry I don't know the weight compared to Marine Grade ply. The lighter the better for a 14'er. We have used Marine plywood and put a nice veneer on each side for an older tinny.

Edited by Old Ironmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

? With marine plywood you are probably not going to have a crack from vibration or trailering go all all the way through the wood and weaken it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

check out Brazilian Ipe wood,stuff is amazing for outdoor use,will out last any pressure treated wood. It is a little pricey but for how much you need it will be worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thought on wood. It's one of those things sooner or later that when water gets in it starts to decay. Unless you hermetically seal the wood, it's almost impossible to achieve, it will happen. I don't care if you use Valspar, varathane, epoxy, cracks will happen. Even the newer version of low VOC Thompsons water sealer is close to a waste of time. If you still have the old stuff it will last longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One tip I can pass along as a result of my buddy FishnSled getting his transom replaced. If your transom has a metal cap on it, I would suggest that you put a rubber gasket between the transom and the cap. It will stop any water from getting under the cap and sitting there, trying to rot your transom.

And I would agree with the other poster re the cherry wood... likely to crack from the vibrations of trailer and or motor. At least with plywood, there is glue in place to help hold it all together; and glue is always stronger than wood.

HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used recycled plastic on mine, then a 1/8 sheet of aluminim where the clamps mount to it. Its there forever. I got the plastic at taylors on hwy 28 north of port hope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to say, i laminated 2 pieces of 3/4" thick plastic to get the thickness i needed. Glued it together with 3m 5200 marine adhesive. Its solid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you never want to take anything apart use 3M 5200, the best adhesive on the market.

 

Ohio Fisherman makes a great point, using a solid hardwood rather than a plywood for a transom may likely crack because of the great amount of stress on it. I would think it also depends on how large a piece needed. As far as wood finally rotting it all will eventually, if done right it will outlive you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't use cherry. White oak is the only wood I would think of using but on a tinner slap some plywood in there and be done with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your transom has a metal cap on it, I would suggest that you put a rubber gasket between the transom and the cap. It will stop any water from getting under the cap and sitting there, trying to rot your transom

 

HH

A strip of Ice and Snow used for roofing can replace a rubber gasket for Marine applications. It is economical and has adhesive on it. Easy to use and cheap to buy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

White oak. It's what boat folks use. Strong and resists rot and moisture. Hard to find nowadays the big building supply stores don't carry it... just red oak. But call around to lumber mills or Kijiji to find 1" or thicker according to width you're replacing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made an outdoor patio set with White Oak 30 years ago. Not a crack or check. Every 8 years or so I give it a swipe of Tung oil. Looks like new today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a piece of oak on the cottage tinner. That was 4 years ago now and good as new. Several coats of tremclad and plenty of 3m 5200 everywhere I put a bolt hole or screw and it will last another 30 years I'm sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...