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FLEX ROD

Heating a Bunkie - NF

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Well I finally finished insulating my 9' x 12' x 14' Bunkie with a loft and now I am looking at finding a good heater for it.

 

The Bunkie was build by some Amish so it is solid wood and the roof is metal, like I said the roof is insulated but the rest of it is not except the floor which I laid down some under pad and then laminate flooring.

 

The power is being supplied via a generator and I did buy an infrared heater that worked great for about 1 hour and then just quit working would not even turn on promptly returned the next day.

 

Help, I need to have heat in the Bunkie so that when I go up I can spend a night or two.

 

Looking forward to reading your replies,

 

Thanks FLEX - John

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Oil filled electric radiator would keep it toasty but would take a while to get it there. I use a fan forced utility electric (like one at giant tiger for about 39.00) for quick hear while electric radiator warms up as my landlord thinks oil is too expensive to run the furnace & heat the whole house. I'm comfortable but I wouldn't want his electric bill. You're running a genny so it shouldn't make a huge deal for you. I'd be considering a small airtight woodstove myself, if you haven't already.

 

Michael

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For my fish hut (10X7) I installed a 25000 BTU RV furnace; runs on 12 DCV and propane and is thermostat controlled.

Last winter -25° outside, set the thermostat to 16-18° and it was nice and warm, with the furnace cycling maybe every 15 - 20 minutes and run for about 5 minutes.

Was out for about 10 hours on that -25° day; checked the propane tank the next day and I would have had to weigh it; because I couldn't feel the difference from it being full.

Easy to install, cut a hole in a wall and stuff it through; it's all self contained. There's only 4 wires to connect; power, ground and two for the thermostat.

It's a used unit I picked up for $300.00 form a RV salvage yard; There must be some of those close by you to check out. New these furnaces run around $2500.00; I can get them wholesale for around $1800.00

 

Dan.

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Heating with wood will definitely add to the ambiance but without the place being totally insulated, you might be going to bed roasting and waking up in the morning freezing.

 

I have the same issue at my cottage (wood heat only) when the weather is really cold. I sleep in a cold weather, synthetic (not down) sleeping bag. It helps buffer the temperature swings.

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Thanks guys,

 

Oil filled electric radiator would keep it toasty but would take a while to get it there. I use a fan forced utility electric (like one at giant tiger for about 39.00) for quick hear while electric radiator warms up as my landlord thinks oil is too expensive to run the furnace & heat the whole house. I'm comfortable but I wouldn't want his electric bill. You're running a genny so it shouldn't make a huge deal for you. I'd be considering a small airtight woodstove myself, if you haven't already.

 

Michael

I like the idea of the wood stove any thoughts on how much it wood cost?

 

Thanks - FLEX - John

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I have a bunkie at my cottage and I heat it with a Coleman oil burning space heater that I burn diesel fuel but you could also use kerosene if you wanted. Diesel fuel is a whole lot cheaper. The one I have is similar to the one in the picture.

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John get yer pooter warmed up and hit kijiji or any of the facebook buy n sell groups. You could go new for up to 2 grand or more depending on what you select or pick up used for as little as 300 bux. It all depends on what you can find with a little digging. Installation in a bunkie shouldn't be too hard BUT if you buy used try to make sure you can get matching chimney fittings if it comes with any insulated chimney pipes to adapt to your situation. You can run the chimney out thru a wall or up thru the roof depending on what you get/buy. Just be sure to safely maintain clearances and/or install something between the stove and walls (sheet metal etc) to help reflect the heat as well as protect the walls. There's a ton of info you can google to help with the install - take advantage of it before you even start shopping but especially before you cut any holes!

Good Luck, post pix we wanna see it all!

 

Michael

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I was going to mention a kerosene heater to avoid all the other expenses attached with running a chimney. Wood is really nice though.

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Just don't get stupid and put yourself to sleep for good with an unvented source of heat. Anything that burns fuel is not a safe indoor heater. Why I stick with my drafty Frabil ice hut as I know fresh air is getting in while I burn that sunflower!

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Great replies folks, many thanks, so what is the difference between a wood stove and an airtight wood stove???

 

No experience with stoves, I am a fire place guy.

 

thanks John

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A true airtight wood stove allows you to control the amount of air it receives to allow combustion, usually thru a pair of knobs. This keeps the fire burning but at a slower rate than if it were allowed all the air it could handle. Think of how much wood a campfire goes thru - it gets all the air it can handle so whooosh! In an airtight the only air it gets is via the intake which can be damped down to nothing (fire would go out then). Other models will have air controls but their construction doesnt allow 100% control of the combustion air (the one in Canucks link doesn't seem to be a true airtight but it ain't bad either).

Thus with a true airtight you can get a longer burn, use less wood and keep some control on the temperature. Non-airtights might see you loading it up every hour or two vs 6-9 hrs with an airtight. Get one with a glass door and you'll have a night light to boot! You can even buy a fan unit that sits on top and the heat makes the fan spin, moving the air around.

 

Michael

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Like what Terry and I said a trailer heater/furnace; light them and forget them and they are very fuel efficient.

Then like the other's have said wood stoves are great, other then when the wood burns out in the middle of the night.

If you are thinking of going wood, see if you can find a stove that is also rated for coal. Burn the wood during your awake times and then at bedtime throw a load of coal in. Coal will burn much slower and produces more heat over a longer period of time.

 

Dan.

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If money is truly not a concern try googling "wood pellet stoves" and learn about the ones that have an auto feeder. Big bux but big convenience too!

 

Michael

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Just don't get stupid and put yourself to sleep for good with an unvented source of heat. Anything that burns fuel is not a safe indoor heater. Why I stick with my drafty Frabil ice hut as I know fresh air is getting in while I burn that sunflower!

 

I leave the front door open. ;)

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If money is truly not a concern try googling "wood pellet stoves" and learn about the ones that have an auto feeder. Big bux but big convenience too!

 

Michael

 

Better yet look @ a Wiseway pellet stove.

They are the only one that doesn't use any power.

They are gravity fed.

 

http://www.wisewaypelletstove.com/

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I read through the online manual for this heater. There's no way I'd use it in a bunkie...it's designed as an emergency backup heater with very specific venting requirements.

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Unless you can rig your genny to run off a marine fuel tank, you're not going to be able to run a heater all night. Are you even looking for heat through the night or are you ok with it dropping off overnight ?

 

I plan to build a bunkie/shed at my cabin and was thinking of using this for heat. The wood load is small so you're not going to be able to bank for a long burn it but it shld be good for a couple of hours if you control the burn well. http://cubicminiwoodstoves.com/collections/grizzly-cb-1210

 

Either that or get a portable woodstove on sale at LeBaron.

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TSC , Tractor Supply Company , has lots of electric, kerosene and propane heaters and smaller wood/pellet/corn burning stoves for heating rooms in a barn or small outbuilding workshops.

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You might want to check this option out for a wood stove.

 

Mini Wood Stoves

Private message your Postal Code/Zip to get shipping cost and info

Located in Lindsay, Ontario and we ship across North America

17" x 10" x 10" fire box size..
4" Stove pipe opening.. Price $275.00

14" x 9" x 9" fire box size..
4" Stove pipe opening.. Price $225.00

12" x 8" x 8" fire box size..
3" Stove pipe opening.. Price $200.00

All are made with 3/16" steel (same as full size stoves)
All have a 2" lip on the front
These stoves are built to last and hold the heat!
Holes in the feet to bolt them down

Stove pipes available

3" pipe 2' length $15.00 each
3" elbows $15.00 each

4" pipe 2' length $15.00 each
4" elbows $15.00 each

All stoves are treated with stove black

Legs can be custom ordered to height wanted up to 10"

Prices are in Canadian Funds

email: [email protected]
https://www.facebook.com/miniwoodstoves

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I read through the online manual for this heater. There's no way I'd use it in a bunkie...it's designed as an emergency backup heater with very specific venting requirements.

 

Yes, it's always nice to know you will wake up in the morning! Safety first!

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Wood stove hands down, no question about it. You don't need anything fancy either. Just a small stove and lots of wood. I heat my whole house almost all winter with a single woodstove. The furnace kicks in if its really cold, but 90% of the time its just the stove.

 

 

S.

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