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duke01

Back trolling plug

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Anybody ever try back trolling plugs for steelhead? Mainly out of a drift boat on a larger ontario river(with shallow and deep pools). Not asking for spots or anything just wondering if people do it in Ontario. Thanks.

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You mean hot shotting?

 

Trolling facing upriver while the current pulls you down river?

 

Thats what I was thinking Mike.

 

I do it when ever I can. Hot shotting is a blast.

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Yes, that is what i was talking about. Seen lots of videos and info from the States but not much from Ontario. I just got a drift boat and want to try it. Can you do it any time in the fall or is it better on winter steelhead?

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I have gotten salmon and steel head doing this. I even got my one and only,skamania doing it. My go to is kwik fish baits.

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You need a decent flow in the rivers to make it worth while.

 

Hey Ralph.

 

Ya, I like to use the head of pools or tail outs that I can wade out too. I still have one bait that I bought from a board member years ago I have yet to try it. The only reason I havent is cuz, I dont want to lose it.

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Yes, that is what i was talking about. Seen lots of videos and info from the States but not much from Ontario. I just got a drift boat and want to try it. Can you do it any time in the fall or is it better on winter steelhead?

 

Fall/spring when the water isn't super cold. You'll need big flows though to make use of that technique (if you're fishing from a boat)

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Did someone say Kwikfish? :D

 

3J7A9026_zps1hiz1rej.jpg

 

I don't own a boat, but do occasionally back down various lures like Kwikfish, hotshots, hot n' tots, wiggle warts, shad raps and river rockers into log jams and hold them there. When the temps are up like in fall or late spring, I prefer casting and retrieving. In winter, I find dropping plugs back and holding them in the current is much more effective than casting. In winter, steelhead really don't want to chase lures. If you have ability to back lures into log jams with a boat, you can do really well even in the dead of winter.

 

Depending on the lure you're running, you'd be surprised at how little current is required to get decent action out of some plugs (kwikfish being one if you have some weight up the line). Others like hot n tots and wiggle warts require a bit more current to get them down and working.

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Depending on the lure you're running, you'd be surprised at how little current is required to get decent action out of some plugs (kwikfish being one if you have some weight up the line). Others like hot n tots and wiggle warts require a bit more current to get them down and working.

I anchor in slow water and just let them dance in the current. K9 Kwikfish about 100' behind the boat. No need to go deep where I fish. Average depth is 10'. They come up and smash it.

Back in the late 60's early 70's a black or skunk X5 Flatfish was the had to have lure for steelhead on the Saugeen.

That and a black Willowleaf spoon made by Algonquin if memory serves me well.

Kwikfish came some time later. Developed by a designer from Flatfish. He apparently didn't like the wire spreader and the double treble on the bellies of Flatfish. So he started his own company and Kwikfish were born.

He's since been bought out by Luhr Jensen as have several others.

Edited by Roe Bag

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Cabelas has some, but they are made with single hooks. I have some of the older ones with the spreader (two small trebles) and single in the back.

 

Mike, of all those there, theres not one of my favorites. LOL

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Did someone say Kwikfish? :D

 

3J7A9026_zps1hiz1rej.jpg

 

I don't own a boat, but do occasionally back down various lures like Kwikfish, hotshots, hot n' tots, wiggle warts, shad raps and river rockers into log jams and hold them there. When the temps are up like in fall or late spring, I prefer casting and retrieving. In winter, I find dropping plugs back and holding them in the current is much more effective than casting. In winter, steelhead really don't want to chase lures. If you have ability to back lures into log jams with a boat, you can do really well even in the dead of winter.

 

Depending on the lure you're running, you'd be surprised at how little current is required to get decent action out of some plugs (kwikfish being one if you have some weight up the line). Others like hot n tots and wiggle warts require a bit more current to get them down and working.

Win the lottery? Nice collection!!!

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Cabelas has some, but they are made with single hooks. I have some of the older ones with the spreader (two small trebles) and single in the back.

 

Mike, of all those there, theres not one of my favorites. LOL

 

The ones with the spreader and 2 trebles are flatfish.

 

If you're looking for skunk kwikfish in the pile, there's K5, K6, K7, K8 and K9 in there :D

 

Win the lottery? Nice collection!!!

 

I cleared out a bunch of the vintage colours from several tackle shops that were going out of business. Picked most of them up for $0.99 each :D

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Hadn't heard of this technique before, but it sure makes sense. I just read this article http://www.questoutdoors.net/skills/castspin/articles/hotshot/and have a question. In the case of rods used, why is the length of the rod handle so critical? The guide/author states that handles can't be any longer than 12-14 inches or they simply won't work properly on the great lakes. I don't understand... Tks

 

Cheers

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The ones with the spreader and 2 trebles are flatfish.

 

If you're looking for skunk kwikfish in the pile, there's K5, K6, K7, K8 and K9 in there :D

 

 

 

 

K11,s in pretty colours. :blush:

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That is a good question Smitty55. I would think action and rod length would matter more than the handle length. Thanks to everyone for the replays.

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The ones with the spreader and 2 trebles are flatfish.

 

 

 

Are you sure? I have Flatfish w/o the spreader. I thought Kwikfish had the spreaders, or did Flatfish change their design and eliminate the spreader?

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Are you sure? I have Flatfish w/o the spreader. I thought Kwikfish had the spreaders, or did Flatfish change their design and eliminate the spreader?

 

Flatfish come in models with and without the spreaders. Le Barons had a few medium sized flatfish at the Markham location with the spreaders the last time I was there. When I was a kid, the salesman at the local shop said the spreader was there to hook anything that came close to investigate.LOL

 

I've never seen a Kwikfish with a spreader.

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As you can see, Mikey got me hooked on the skunk. The top one is a KWIK . The rest are flat. You,ll notice that one flat,(right out of the box above) is a flat but with no spreader.

 

DSCF3454_zpse7tkmg8t.jpg

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