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FLEX ROD

Generator- how big watt size

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Well folks, since we have bought the property in Eugenia, I have been busy trying to clear some of it so that I could get a shed / bunkie on it.

 

Well I got my call that the bunkie will be delivered on Wednesday :clapping: so now I need to get a generator for it and for the future construction but I have no clue regarding size and which brand to look at or better stated which brand to stay away from.

 

The only thing that I do know is that it should be at least 4000 watt probably 5000 but that is all any help in what size and what brand would be a great help.

 

Thanks FLEX

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Make a list of what you will be running at the same time. you then look at the items and find the amp rating for the device and the voltage. Then you take the amps multiply by the voltage to get the watts it uses. Add all of them together and add 20% more. That is the wattage you need to run the items including start up amp draw.

The brand is the best one you can buy and can get serviced locally. There is a reason off brand generators are cheaper it is either the stability of the generator to provide pure AC or poorly made engine.

 

Art

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Thanks for the question folks, I do not expect to run that much off of it concurrently, a light a small heater of some sort it is a 9' x 12' x 14' bunkie and my computer and charge my cell phone.

 

During construction phase just some basic power tools that is why I have settled on the 4-5000 watt so I hope that this helps.

 

Thanks FLEX

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If you can afford them I'd look at Honda or Yamaha generators. Very quiet compared to other brands (your neighbours will be very happy) and they will be able to run on idle speed for low loads.Again, very spendy but it's what I would get. I'd also be wheeling them back home as well since gennys are a popular item among the five finger set ;)

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5000 wattts will support 41 amps. A space heater at 1500 watts is 13 amps, 4 amps for lights and 4 for chargers and computer. 21 x 20% is 4 or 25 amps load. A second heater will put you at the max for the generator. Your average heavy duty drill, skill saw or other tools will also max out the generator with only one heater running.

 

 

Art

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Thanks woodenboater but I also need to keep costs down, in an ideal world you are correct that would be an easy decisions.

 

FLEX

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I have built my cabin with a 2000 watt Yamaha generator.

Granted I don't run a heater off it, that's what wood/pellet stoves or propane heaters are for.

The only time I've had issues is running a Hilti TE80 rotary hammer as it tripped the breaker due to current draw.

I have a 4000 watt that I can run heavier draw items off.

My 4 KW unit is a Champion I bought when CT had a sale. ;)

It starts and runs great but is noticeably louder and uses quite a bit more fuel than the smaller Yammie.

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My wife made me purchase a generator prior to Y2K2.....I bought a Yamaha portable 2600. Best investment idea she had. It has come in extremely handy a number of times. Ice and wind storms, vehicles hitting utility poles, even brown outs. Reasonably quiet.

When needed and depending on time of year, I can run two fridges, several lights, the fan on a propane fireplace and the TV or computer. When the power was out for the ice storm, it ran for three days straight on five tanks of gas.

I have thought many times of going to a larger generator that will run the house and come on automatically, but so far haven't pulled the trigger.

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Take a look at surgemaster. They use Honda motors but are less expensive than a Honda. We have one at Moms place, it's a good genny but not quite as quiet as a factory Honda unit. I have. A 3500 watt Canadian tire deal at my place. The trick is to maintain them and run them often. We've gotten many many hundreds of hours of run time off of cheaper generators at the hunt camp by maintaining them well. One day I'll buy a high end unit but for now the one I have does pretty well. I have a fireplace though and additional kerosene heaters to, so not running heat. In reality I think you'll be just fine with a 5k unit.

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Running a generator at 80% or higher will cause fluctuations that can damage todays electronics. Computers, microwaves, and other circuit intensive products need a clean steady source of power with a 60hertz sine wave. Less expensive generators put out a "dirty" sine wave that will over time damage or in some cases will not even power up some electronics. The off brand units have a much wider sine wave and it gets dirtier the closer you get to the max capacity. Motors that use brushes could care less how dirty the sine is because the brushes create more "noise" than the worst generator. By pressing a generator to run over its intended rate or close to its max is hard on the generator but can shorten the life of electronics running on it.

 

 

Art

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Thanks for the question folks, I do not expect to run that much off of it concurrently, a light a small heater of some sort it is a 9' x 12' x 14' bunkie and my computer and charge my cell phone.

 

During construction phase just some basic power tools that is why I have settled on the 4-5000 watt so I hope that this helps.

 

Thanks FLEX

A Honda EU 3000 or Yamaha equivalent will suit you fine. Your best option is to rent for a couple days to find out that you don't need Niagara Falls and the Adam Beck generating station.

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Ditto

What Art said,

Stick with Honda, their inverter type generators will give you clean power and trouble free service, specially during the cold months.

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I have a 20 year old Honda 3500w and it works like a charm! At least where you are civilization isn't too far if you need help or the generator quits... But definitely consider another heat source, heat and lights make the gennie run like mad and you will burn through gas like crazy!

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For heat try looking for a used RV furnace; that's what I put in my fish hut. They run on propane and 12 volts DC; working properly they sip both.

8 hours in the hut, -20°C outside (not including windchill) set the thermostat at 20°C; the furnace would cycle maybe every 15 minutes. Tested battery when I got home and it still showed 70% charged and just by picking up the propane tank, I couldn't tell it was used.

The install is a breeze, if you can flare copper tubing and know how to use a 12v test light.

If you go that route or something similar, make sure the genny has a 12VDC port to charge the battery; while you're working with your other electric tools.

Also went with LED lighting in the fish hut; gives off lots of light with every little voltage consumed

 

Dan.

 

IMG_0726.JPG

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I have a 20 year old Honda 3500w and it works like a charm! At least where you are civilization isn't too far if you need help or the generator quits... But definitely consider another heat source, heat and lights make the gennie run like mad and you will burn through gas like crazy!

 

Do yourself a favour and use LED lights. ;)

​Currently I have the equivalent of 360 watts (incandescent bulbs) that only draw a total of 54 watts. :)

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Do yourself a favour and use LED lights. ;)

​Currently I have the equivalent of 360 watts (incandescent bulbs) that only draw a total of 54 watts. :)

Big time, converted my travel trailer to LED, they only take 10% of an incandescent bulb :clapping:

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Big time, converted my travel trailer to LED, they only take 10% of an incandescent bulb :clapping:

I agree 100% with the LED lights. Im surprised I didnt think of that, considering Im an electrician and do tons of LED...

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Thanks folks, settled on a Champion – 4000 W Portable Gasoline Generator so I will see how it works out.

 

FLEX

 

I have one in my garage since the Ice storm and It's never been started :(. Let me know how it goes.

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Running a generator at 80% or higher will cause fluctuations that can damage todays electronics. Computers, microwaves, and other circuit intensive products need a clean steady source of power with a 60hertz sine wave. Less expensive generators put out a "dirty" sine wave that will over time damage or in some cases will not even power up some electronics. The off brand units have a much wider sine wave and it gets dirtier the closer you get to the max capacity. Motors that use brushes could care less how dirty the sine is because the brushes create more "noise" than the worst generator. By pressing a generator to run over its intended rate or close to its max is hard on the generator but can shorten the life of electronics running on it.

 

 

Art

Oh YEAH! Found that out the hard way. One older TV, smoke detectors, answering machine etc. all cooked by low voltage and poor quality power. Now I hesitate to use the generator until the outages is extended. I cycle my loads religiously now I'll tell you.

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I see the new TSC flyer starting today , they have the Champion 338cc 5500/6500W generator on sale, save $400 bucks off the 999.99 price, this week only $599.99.

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There is a way around the dirty voltage, it may sound like the long way around; but it works for sensitive electronics.

Get a 12dcv/120acv inverter, large enough to run whatever device you plan on running with the generator. Connect the generator to a 12 volt DC battery to keep it charged. The generator will run at its lowest (cleanest) output. Connect the inverter to the battery; then the device plugs into the inverter; clean steady AC voltage.

 

Dan.

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