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FrankTheRabbit

Question about jig/plastic rigging weights

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This may be getting into the nitty gritty or perhaps over thinking the situation, but when you rig, do you take into account the overall total weight or just the weight of the jig/tungsten sinker?

 

Eg., if a rod has a lure rating of 5/16oz-3/4oz, does the total weight of the sinker and plastic stay within that range or you just take into account the weight of the sinker/jig only?

 

This was just something in my mind for a while. I usually just choose the weight of the jig/sinker and disregard the weight of the plastic, which perhaps is being sloppy on my part.

 

Thanks.

Edited by FrankTheRabbit

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Your way overthinking things. They are only fish lol

 

S.

Agreed. I've seen a guy on YouTube who caught a bass drop shotting a Twizzler's lol.

 

I was just wondering about staying within the range of the rod's lure rating. The jig rod has a 5/16oz-3/4oz rating and being a jig rod, I was wondering if it takes into account of the sinker/jig + plastic or not. If I choose a 3/4 sinker and add a 5" plastic craw, the overall weight would prob add up to 1oz. Not too worried about whether or not it will catch fish, but moreso having the rod work within its range properly.

 

If I use a spinnerbait or crank, I'll make sure to stay within the specified lure range.

Edited by FrankTheRabbit

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Yep, overthinking it a tad, or more. My go to rod is a jig rod when I have a jig on it, a crank bait rod when I have a crank bait on it a trolling rod etc. etc. I am probably under thinking it. I can't spell parabolic let alone stress over it.

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I'm old and had fished for a long time, I knew when too much weight could be an issue for a rod. I have a spinning rod that was made on a flipping stick blank, it is rated at like 3/8ths to 1 1/2 ounce lures, I very rarely used anything over 3/16ths ounce on it. That recommended weight is usually a clue to the rod's stiffness and how easily it will be to fish heavier cover with it.

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Yep, overthinking it a tad, or more. My go to rod is a jig rod when I have a jig on it, a crank bait rod when I have a crank bait on it a trolling rod etc. etc. I am probably under thinking it. I can't spell parabolic let alone stress over it.

I think some of us (me included) have been swooned over technique specific rods, when all you really need is one, maybe two max (casting & spinning) that would cover 90% of the fishing out there. I'm just a weekend angler, but I always find it intriguing playing with different rods and reels. Just to get a glimpse of their though process of how they interpret would be the best tool for the job.

 

I'm old and had fished for a long time, I knew when too much weight could be an issue for a rod. I have a spinning rod that was made on a flipping stick blank, it is rated at like 3/8ths to 1 1/2 ounce lures, I very rarely used anything over 3/16ths ounce on it. That recommended weight is usually a clue to the rod's stiffness and how easily it will be to fish heavier cover with it.

 

Ya, this is what I was being worried about...I think I'll just be more conscientious with total lure weight (jig/sinker + trailer) and stay within that range to get the optimal functionality of the rod.

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It's worth thinking about. A 1/4 oz weight in front of a big, bulky flipping plastic is going to load your rod way more than that same weight with a skinny finesse worm. More importantly, the fall rate - IMHO one of the most important attributes of any soft plastic technique - is going to be completely different. Overweighting a rod also reduces the sensitivity a fair bit.

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I take the weight of the plastic into account. considering a normal senko weighs about 3/8 of an ounce and a craw can weigh much more, I definitely pay attention to it.

 

Does this mean I never overload my rods? No. Some of my rods take the extra weight very well while others don't. My jig rod doesn't seem to care. My texas rig rod on the other hand, sucks if overloaded.

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