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Cordless drywall screw gun


wormdunker
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I'm starting a renovation project at home & wish to purchase a cordless drywall screw gun. I saw a video of a guy using this screw gun with a cartridge type screw magazine. Awesome tool! While installing a sheet of drywall it frees up 1 hand to hold the drywall. You're not fumbling for a screw in your pouch while attempting to hold the sheet in place with your knee, elbow or head! I saw them online at a store in Cinncinnati, Ohio. The company is called "Nail Gun Depot". They sell every imaginable air nailer, or screw gun known to man. The particular gun I am interested in is "Senco Duraspin" model DS 215. It's 18 volt, comes with a charger, 2 batteries & a bonus of a free rotozip type tool for cut outs at the electrical boxes, window frames & doors. It's $259.00. Lowes has the Dewalt corded gun (without the screw magazine) for $139.00 & the roto zip cutter is $129.00. Total $270.00 - & still fumbling to get a screw in place. Any & all comments are greatly appreciated. I'm a little nervous shopping on line. Does anybody know if I can get this tool in the Niagara, Hamilton area? I'll even drive to the GTA if necessary.

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Gentek Building Products

41 Brockley Dr Unit 3

905-561-1424

 

Whitebird Paper Products

690 Rennie St

905-544-7575

 

Both are in Hamilton. Could also check into any local Fastenal stores, pretty sure they carry it in the Brampton and Mississauga locations.

 

Good luck!

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Get yourself a holster for that screw gun too if their available and you'll be able to free up both hands without having to lay it down on the floor all the time.

Edited by lew
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Makita and DeWalt both make battery operated drywall guns. Strip loading guns are neat, but strips need to be bought and usually arent cheap. You can start with a few, but mos need to be reloaded with screws. If you dont splurge for a box of strips. Which I believe costs a lot more than a box of screws. While they may seem easier, they are also prone to jamming. Nothing worse than getting a sheet over your head and have a strip jam on you. Most all drywall guns come with a belt clip as well. So I wouldnt worry about a holster. Especially with a strip loading gun. Likely wouldnt fit.

 

From a proffesional stand point( I have done Commercial and Residential drywall for years) buy a corded gun. Rigid, DeWalt, Makita, and Milwaukee, all make fairly decent corded guns, to name a few, most for a decent price.

 

The trick for ceilings is after a screw is sunk, flip your gun so you are holding the body of the gun, not the grip, and use the gun to hold the sheet up while grabbing a screw with your other hand. Place the screw on the gun while you and it are holding the sheet in place then switch hands. A screw pouch comes in handy for this.

 

 

Another good idea if using a corded gun, is to hang your extension cord at the connection over your tool belt, so you always have the reach of the lenght of the guns cord. This way you generally dont have to worry about setting your stool or ladder on your guns cord.

Edited by Parnelly
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Like Lew says. I've done 3/4 of the rooms in my house and have helped numerous friends/cottage builders

 

A good rechargeable drill with a torque control on the chuck. Get it set that the resistance on the chuck breaks so the screws don't go deep and break the paper front on the drywall sheet

A decent tool belt to hold the drill and a pouch for a full box of drywall screws

 

and buy about a dozen of these

http://www.lowes.com/pd_300547-353-DWS2_0__?productId=1208867

 

I've always hung drywall with the seams running vertical. Seen alot of the pros hanging horizontal starting from the bottom. Makes the but ends a little harder to mud but they say doing it horizontal is much easier one man job

 

I've got a basement job coming up (25 sheets) and haven't decided which way to go yet.

 

and one more item is that rotary cutter to do the boxes. makes excellent and clean cuts around the boxes. I have the rotozip and they are a bit messy but worth it for anything like boxes, pot light,...

Edited by Fang
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In housing, unless its less than 4' wide, say the side of a closet, never stand a sheet up on wood. Always lay them down. A rotozip is a great tool but definitely has a learning curve. You may mess up a few if you have never done it before. Also read the rotozip instructions as there is a correct way to use them. Guide point router bits are a good help too, as its easy to cut through a box, or its little tabs that hold the recepticle in place with your standard sabre cut bits. As a proffesional i strongly suggest against using the dimpler suggested in the previous post. There is no replacement for a drywall gun.

 

Fang, never stand your sheets up on wood, especially in a basement. Unless you dont mind going to fix cracks. Again, if its less than 4' feel free to stand them. Or if you are boarding a fire wall. Also always board from the ceiling down, Never stack upwards to the ceiling.

 

Standing sheets is for fire rated systems, generally on steel stud, but sometimes wood in row housing where units are connected. The idea is that the seam of the board is backed continuously. Fire rated partitions are designed this way mostly in commercial applications, providing a specified burn time, based on the thickness and layers of drywall.

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Thanx for all the info guys. Looks like I'll be investing in a corded screw gun, as mentioned the strips of nails tend to jam sometimes. Also after some thought - Can I acquire the screws for a Senco gun locally. Also after researching again the screws for the Senco gun are $68.00 per 4000 units. Very costly plus shipping from Ohio. I would like to add more of my own comments but it's 8:30 pm, haven't had supper due to being at the Hamilton boat/fishing show all afternoon. That show was priority! LOL!

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Just get an impact with the drywall screw bit, for the use you'll get out of it it will do you every bit of good the other will other than the magazine of screws but what else is a tool belt good for?

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The Hamilton boat show was good. Lottsa boats & fishing gear. I prefer the smaller shows as opposed to the bigger Toronto boat show. I was able to view everything I wanted in 4 hours. Toronto boat show I need to camp over for 2 days & still not see all the vendors!

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Hi, I'm a master electrician/ builder. I've built several houses from scratch and have never seen one used on a site. Floor screws yes but never drywall screws. The pros will start with nails to hold sheets in place then go around and screw it all. There are magnetic tips (dimplers) that work great. if you don't do it every day? why invest in a tool that's going to sit more than not? And believe me I love buying new tools almost as much as buying fishing stuff! Dewalt make quality tips for that purpose. I've seen a lot of generals that do it but not every day line up the sheet quickly mark the studs jab nails into the marks. Then pop it in, hit a few nails and move on leaving it for the screw guy.,. Hope that helps! PS They use special "blue" nails.

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I have done a lot of houses where builders wont allow the use of ring nails. Nails are know for popping. Lots of shackers prefer nails though. Its quicker to tack sheets with nails. Personally I use all screws. Screws dont back out. And every corner bead I have ever seen that nails were used for installion cracks and breaks apart. In some cases even falling off.

 

There has been a lot of good pieces of advice offered here by many. Its up to you to decide which methods work best for you. Everyone has a different way of doing things.

 

Just for the record, impact guns are the absolute worst drywall installion. As someone else mentioned an actual cordless drill, would be the way to go if you decide you dont want to use a drywall gun.

 

I prefer Makita's tools myself. 6000rpm drywall gun, and cordless lithium, drill/impact combo set are what I use for framing/boarding. Bosch pretty much makes the best drywall routers too. The Dewalt versions are screamers.

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I have done a lot of houses where builders wont allow the use of ring nails. Nails are know for popping. Lots of shackers prefer nails though. Its quicker to tack sheets with nails. Personally I use all screws. Screws dont back out. And every corner bead I have ever seen that nails were used for installion cracks and breaks apart. In some cases even falling off.

 

There has been a lot of good pieces of advice offered here by many. Its up to you to decide which methods work best for you. Everyone has a different way of doing things.

 

Just for the record, impact guns are the absolute worst drywall installion. As someone else mentioned an actual cordless drill, would be the way to go if you decide you dont want to use a drywall gun.

 

I prefer Makita's tools myself. 6000rpm drywall gun, and cordless lithium, drill/impact combo set are what I use for framing/boarding. Bosch pretty much makes the best drywall routers too. The Dewalt versions are screamers.

So long as you don't break the paper and are actually competent there's nothing wrong with using an impact. Might wanna start off with an "IMO"

 

To each their own though.

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Thanx for all the advice guys. This site is awesome for asking technical questions such as my renovation. I've decided to purchase a corded drywall screw gun. The "toy" I was originally thinking isn't really worth it after I gave it careful consideration. Very costly considering I may only use it for this project (44 sheets), - buying it on line - what if I need a repair, their screws are very expensive, I would have to order screws on line in the future & wait for shipping & may jam up as Parnelly stated, then as Schloim stated it's going to sit in my garage & collect dust. Hell I just might buy a couple of those cheap dimplers for my cordless drill. Parnelly - thanx for the advice about Dewalt routers being noisy. I'm not ready for drywall just yet - so I still have time to consider your comments. Thanx guys!

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Parnelly the quote feature isn't working on this site, I can't even cut and paste. But I need you to clarify what you are saying on one of your posts. It was the post March 6 at 10:42 AM.

 

When you say never stand the drywall sheet "up" do you mean vertically rather than horizontal. I always laid them horizontal that way I could use a 12 footer by myself. And less taping, always. Why would cracks be more frequent laying a sheet vertically? And why does fire rating affected by how the sheet was laid?

 

Whoever said screws don't pop you need to go into some of these tract homes and see for yourself. My cousin bought a town house below the mountain in Beamsville. Screws coming out everywhere. They used finger jointed 2X3 in all non load bearing walls, finger jointed to boot. They must have gone in dripping wet too. The twisting in these 2X3's is ridiculous. There's even rust showing at these screw pops. These places went for big money too. He asked the builder why 2X3's and was told to increase interior space, what a joke. I bet some of those support walls are 2X3, I didn't measure, but dollars to donuts they are. No one was allowed to go in while being built, I did, all they can do is kick you out. That will be the day I buy a 400K townhouse and can't see how they are built. What I saw that day was nuts. For another thread, sorry Wormdunker, I mean Mr. Wormdunker. I will elaborate if WD says OK.

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It's OK "Mr." Ironmaker. I love reading stories such as yours. I do ALL of my own work for the reasons you have stated. I built this house 31 years ago & have never hired a contractor for anything after it was built except a painter 10 years ago. After the painter completed his work, I paid him in cash. Shortly after I noticed some of the base board had poor paint coverage. Our verbal agreement stated 1 coat of primer & 2 coats of paint on all surfaces. He obviously cheated me by applying only 1 coat of paint. He painted only 1 coat on most of the base boards - WHY - because it's hard to view unless you get down on your hands & knees!! I phoned him & pointed this out to him. His reply was that my trim was garbage & he hung up the phone! I wish I had his name & number - I would post it here & other forums I visit.

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Parnelly the quote feature isn't working on this site, I can't even cut and paste. But I need you to clarify what you are saying on one of your posts. It was the post March 6 at 10:42 AM.

 

When you say never stand the drywall sheet "up" do you mean vertically rather than horizontal. I always laid them horizontal that way I could use a 12 footer by myself. And less taping, always. Why would cracks be more frequent laying a sheet vertically? And why does fire rating affected by how the sheet was laid?

 

Whoever said screws don't pop you need to go into some of these tract homes and see for yourself. My cousin bought a town house below the mountain in Beamsville. Screws coming out everywhere. They used finger jointed 2X3 in all non load bearing walls, finger jointed to boot. They must have gone in dripping wet too. The twisting in these 2X3's is ridiculous. There's even rust showing at these screw pops. These places went for big money too. He asked the builder why 2X3's and was told to increase interior space, what a joke. I bet some of those support walls are 2X3, I didn't measure, but dollars to donuts they are. No one was allowed to go in while being built, I did, all they can do is kick you out. That will be the day I buy a 400K townhouse and can't see how they are built. What I saw that day was nuts. For another thread, sorry Wormdunker, I mean Mr. Wormdunker. I will elaborate if WD says OK.

 

 

Alrighty, a horizontal sheet, is reffered to a laying the sheet down. A vertical sheet, with the 4' (butt edge) on the floor is known as standing the sheet. In steel stud construction, and in fire rated wood partitions, the drywall must be stood on its 4' edge. The reason for that is so the joint(beveled edge/seam) would be continously backed by the stud. This doesnt allow for air moviement between the sheets, A sheet layed down spans the studs, meaning that air can pass through on the beveled edge between the studs. Where air can pass through, fire can penetrate.

 

Wood stud is known to have movement in the drying process, if lumber is not competely dry when drywall is installed, there is a chance of cracking as a stud can warp or move as it dries. Basements generally have moisutre content which can be absorbed by the wood, absorbtion and drying can also cause movement. In a situation with wet wood, even screws will pop. Which leads me to your next comment. Modern day housing is built any time of the year. Many builders dont wait for wood to dry, sometimes even in winter building. Houses go up pretty fast these days, and the budget minded builder tend to cut corners ie, finger jointed studs.

 

Screw pops can relate to a number of things, generally moisture, or structural shifting. Which is why in steel stud construction, load bearing wall's typically use a deflective top plate. Alowing for movement without buckling the drywall. Housing not so much. Rusted screws is definitely not good. There must be high moisture content. I did some drywall at the YMCA here in Peterborough a few years back in the pool area. One of the spec's was that we must use galvanized screws, due to the moisture content as well as chlorine. Galvanized screws dont rust.

 

Hope this answer some of your questions.

Edited by Parnelly
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Awesome advice Mr. Parnelly. I'm taking it all in! Purchased a roto zip today. I see on you tube to cut out an electrical box you must move in a counterclockwise direction or the roto zip will want to skate away from the intended line. Finger jointed studs - that's garbage. I don't even buy 2x4s from Home Depot. I can't be bothered to sort through their crap to find some straight ones. I buy lumber from my local TM BER mart. Very good people, pay the bill, drive my truck into their sheltered warehouse & they load it for me! Similar situation with my local family owned hardware store 2 minutes from my house. Their Pex fittings are 35 -40% cheaper than Home Depot & they lend me the cutter & crimper for free! Home Depot would want you to sign over your truck for this kind of service!!

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Parnelli, an excellent explanation in layman's terms. And I always thought the drywallers were speaking gibberish. Not really, just another language amongst themselves. I'm struggling with the difference laying down or standing up a sheet makes a difference to how air movement and thus fire migration is effected. I'm a bit of a slow learner, but I'll have an eureka moment soon.

 

Excellent. Thanks.

Edited by Old Ironmaker
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