Jump to content

Spinning Reel / Rod Set-Up for Bigger Fish


Recommended Posts

It's not like I "need" another rod and reel set-up, but I'm looking at getting a larger spinning reel / rod combo for fishing mid/larger cranks, in-line bucktails, large spoons, or larger soft bodies. I have a decent baitcaster / flippin' stick set-up for suicks, spooks, and deeper trolling that is fine, but it's not often I use those tactics. I think the spinning reel will give me the ability to add about 30% to my cast length. Targeting northerns (when up north) and muskies here at home.

 

Any recommendations? If this has been covered before, please direct me to the post(s).

 

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

well, you won't find much info on the search, as many people don't do what you are looking to do...

 

however, have no worries, I do....

 

When I was reading your post from the top, immediately I had a couple rods in my mind...until I read the bottom, and you said the word muskie.

 

That really limits your options.

 

I have a St Croix Premiere (read, not expensive) Heavy Action Spinning rod that is 3/4 ounce to 2 ounce. Dad had used it slop bass fishing. It would control a "kawartha" or other sub 45" muskie.

 

If you truly think your going to find muskies even bigger than that, you can get into a Shimano Compre Muskie Spinning Rod. But those things are super stiff and wouldn't work for anything else you suggested above.

 

To be honest, I use a great G Loomis IMX 4 power spinning rod (844 model). It would do everything you suggested EXCEPT the muskie part. For that I would suggest the St Croix Premiere Heavy Action rod (that model also has an extra heavy spinning rod....another broomstick).

 

For reels you going to want to get into a 4000 sized reel.

I use the 4000 Shimano Ci4's for a lot of uses.

For your use, I'd go with a 50lbs braid. Fill'er up and your good to go.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Don't let folks tell you a spinning outfit cannot be used for your purpose. You just have ensure your using the right spinning rod.

Link to post
Share on other sites

muskies are not invincible, they put up maybe 1/3 the fight compared to saltwater fish, and spinning gear is common for inshore...spinning gear is common for shore fishing sturgeon

 

your budget will dictate what suggestions to give you

 

I'd look at a shimano 5000 or 6000 spinning reel, stradic, saguaro...on the cheaper end, penn battle reel....braid 50 or up

 

penn, shimano and st Croix all have rods that would do what you want....just a matter how much you feel like spending ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at saltwater quality gear for what you are looking to do.

Both rods and reels.

If they can build gear that is up to the task of catching a 100# GT on giant topwater plugs tossed with spinning gear I think it will do what you want to. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use heavy spinning gear a LOT! Have tried them all and I'd highly recommend either a Stradic 4000 FJ or a Stradic CI4 4000. If you check ebay there's some decent deals on the Stradic 5000FJ and the reality is it's the exact same size as the 4000 just a bigger spool. I think it gets overlooked a bit by the freshwater crowd. If you're looking for something solid and on the cheaper side, albeit a bit heavier, consider the Daiwa Whisker Tournament 1600. The thing is a tank and honestly has a better drag than any of the newer reels on the market.

 

Lots and lots of great options for rods, but you're going to want something with a fast action, at least 7' and rated somewhere in the range of 10-20lb test.

 

My issue with many of these rods is the short butt sections on them. An interesting option as long as 1 piece is okay is the St. Croix Avid series inshore saltwater rods. Really nice sticks with slightly larger handles.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at saltwater quality gear for what you are looking to do.

Both rods and reels.

If they can build gear that is up to the task of catching a 100# GT on giant topwater plugs tossed with spinning gear I think it will do what you want to. ;)

 

Exactly how I think. I have a Fin-nor Inshore spinning reel, fantastic drag on it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a combo that I really like, and I think would suit your needs quite nicely. Take a look at the Cabelas Fish Eagle 50 Salmon/Steelhead Spinning rod line up. I bought the 9' Heavy action rated for 1/2 - 2oz lures. Paired up with a Daiwa Whisker 1600 like Mike suggested, the reel is a tank. Both components are solid, well built and won't break the bank.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you check ebay there's some decent deals on the Stradic 5000FJ and the reality is it's the exact same size as the 4000 just a bigger spool. I think it gets overlooked a bit by the freshwater crowd.

 

Crap! I didn't even know that reel existed!!!!

 

I'd love a 4000 sized/weighted reel with a 5000 capacity!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used one of the Shimano Compre muskie spinnning rods (3/4-2oz) for the first five years I fished for them... With a 3000 sized reel. It did the job for most lures, but a 4000 sized reel would have been even better. 50lb braid.

 

I landed a lot of fish on it... Up to 48". I still use a similar setup now when Pike fishing...

 

Pete

Link to post
Share on other sites

That huge Italian catfish appears to have been caught on spinning gear and there were other videos of big Eurocats , all appear to have been taken on spinning gear, I would think a musky would not be a problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugly Sticks and many other big spinning rods do not have the stiffness required to drive the hooks home when a muskie or big pike bites... I use an 8'6" Ugly Stick for catfishing with circle hooks - it has a very soft tip which is what you need for using circle hooks...

 

For pike and muskie you want that rod to be stiff. Jeez that sounds wrong lol

Edited by Fisherpete
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a thought... If I understand right your goal is to cast further... Right?

 

I'm not sure why unless your a shore fisherman...

 

Also... It's hard to sink those hooks if your casting 200 feet out there...

 

 

 

 

That all being said... check out carp gear... I can cast over 250 feet with my carp rods... And regularily cast rigs that weigh 3-8 oz... That's with 50lb braid and a 100lb leader around 30-40 feet long...

 

Most carp rods are 12-13' long but there are some new rods that are shorter...

 

I think Nash tackle made a line up called "dwarf" rods...

 

Also plenty or reel options out there as carp fisherman almost exclusively use spinning gear...

 

 

Big carp tackle

Carp kit

 

Are both great shops

Link to post
Share on other sites

4000 series reel sounds about perfect, 50lb braid.

 

Without breaking the bank a Shimano Symetre 4000 served me well for about 10, maybe 12 years now... Used and abused it finally seized up last summer but it might still be salvageable if I clean it up. This reel with 50lb braid has taken countless pike up to high 40 inches, char over 20lbs in deathly currents, lakers pushing 30 pounds and even some chinooks and a few sturgeon. It'll handle muskie... it's just your rod choice that'll need to be up to the task of chucking the big baits and driving hooks. Symetre is a workhorse in the Shimano line-up and you could pretty well have two for the price of one. Happen to use the 3000 series reel quite alot and it's done for me everything the 4000 has. Just neither throw lures over 3oz too often as that's what baitcasters are for. ;)

 

Rod choices... some solid mentions but here's another. Check out the TFO Gary Loomis tactical Alaska Series or Inshore Series spinning rods. http://www.tforods.com/conventional-rods/gary-loomis-tactical-series.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugly Sticks and many other big spinning rods do not have the stiffness required to drive the hooks home when a muskie or big pike bites... I use an 8'6" Ugly Stick for catfishing with circle hooks - it has a very soft tip which is what you need for using circle hooks...

 

For pike and muskie you want that rod to be stiff. Jeez that sounds wrong lol

 

Pete I think that involves rod selection? I have a couple of 6 foot one piece ugly stick spinning rods that I used up north, they are very stiff, the stiffest rods I own.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Pete I think that involves rod selection? I have a couple of 6 foot one piece ugly stick spinning rods that I used up north, they are very stiff, the stiffest rods I own.

 

Those are exactly the rods I first purchased when I started fishing for musky and they held up quite well. The more I got into it, those things really about broke my back bending over the boat for the figure 8. I then moved up to some cheaper 7' rods for a while. As I continue to stick solely with musky fishing, I am now upgrading to the St. Croix rods and using 8' or 8 1/2' rods. Sure makes the figure 8's a lot easier and not bending half-way over the boat for the fig-8.

 

My wife likes the shorter rods and she is using the 6' Ugly sticks and they seem to work well for her and casting the larger bicktails and such.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I had the same Ugly Stiks you are talking about at one point - 6', medium heavy action? Stiffer than a lot of rods, yes, but it truly does not have the stiffness to drive home musky sized hooks. I'm talking about hooks like the 7/0's that come on twin ten inlines. Trust me, I lost a ton of muskies because of those rods - they would hit - I would try set the hook - and a few seconds later off. I had a day on Scugog where this happened six consecutive times! If you are casting smaller lures like a Mepps #5, or others with thinner wire trebles, it will work.

 

The Ugly Stik is a tool that you can use for the job. But it is not the ideal tool for what the OP is asking for.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol

 

Im sure uglysticks have changed over the years, but I still have two from when I was a kid.

 

Only thing id ever use them for is panfish and small walleye.

 

They are small rods though, i think a 5'6" and a 6'.

 

Its actually hilarious how durable those rods are

 

No sensitivity at all though

Link to post
Share on other sites

They are much more sensitive now M2B. I use one for perch in 30 foot plus deep water and yet it's stiff enough in the backbone for Smallmouth. Just don't bend it in half like the old TV commercial.

Yeah i figured they had changed over the years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...