Jump to content

Locating steelhead in rivers


shimano19
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone. Today I went to the credit river north of brittania rd for the first time to do some float fishing. I've never fished a river so wide, it was pretty intimidating, I couldn't find any spots that stood out to me to fish. It all looked farly similar and when I did find something it was shallow. I usually fish the east tribs like duffins, bowmanville and the ganny. I do we'll there as I find it easier to locate the steelhead and find holding spots like channels, tailouts and seams. How can I break down the credit to help me locate these steelies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To fish a larger river system, you HAVE to learn to read the water, an best way to do that is go to a smaller trib and look at the way the current moves around obstacles that you can visibly see, rocks will have a little dip behind them with a small eddy or swirl, deep pools will look smoother shallow areas little quicker moving water.

 

heres a video to watch to help you

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9hg0DoSdt0 is part 1

 

part 2 is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1gIB9rzwiM

Edited by FloatnFly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off, fishing anything east of the Humber is pretty much as easy as steelheading goes. Second, avoid using specific spots in your posts.

 

To answer your question, it takes a long time to learn how big systems fish. When fish run and where they are in the river at certain times of the year are extremely important to know. The best thing to do is fish the river when it is clear. Dissect and identify the pools and runs and walk as much of the open sections as possible. You'll be well prepared next time you go.

Edited by VXP
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Break it down. When I first walked down to the Ashuanipi River in Labrador I almost kerplotzed

 

Pic of said river

 

ashuanipe_zps92a48fde.jpg

 

 

Where the hell do I find brook trout in this monster????

 

I simply broke the river down into more managable sizes

 

Look at it as pieces of a river your use to fishing. Don't try to take it all in at once.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Break it down. When I first walked down to the Ashuanipi River in Labrador I almost kerplotzed

 

Pic of said river

 

ashuanipe_zps92a48fde.jpg

 

 

Where the hell do I find brook trout in this monster????

 

I simply broke the river down into more managable sizes

 

Look at it as pieces of a river your use to fishing. Don't try to take it all in at once.

 

 

from the pic, i would start at the boulders in the top right....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ThisPlaceSucks

learn to identify major features of the river.. riffle, pool, tailout, thalweg, etc...

when approaching a stretch of river, fish likely looking water in a grid, starting nearest your feet and working out, and downstream.

learn to read your float. if you're fishing productive water with an ineffective set up, you won't even know fish are there...and your float can tell you how deep it is, and where your bait is in relation to the float as you're fishing.

 

and yeah, don't give away where you're fishing. it's not really necessary info, and steelheaders are a grumpy bunch.

Edited by Dr. Salvelinus
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

from the pic, i would start at the boulders in the top right....

Which might be a good plan except the water is four feet deep right at shore so they were out of flycasting range. But boulders were the right call in front of and behind seemed to always hold fish. The fact that there was a giant caddis hatch didn't hurt. Brook trout, whitefish and landlocked Atlantics were practically shouting were they were.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Investing in a guiding service is never a bad idea. Along with putting you on fish, he'll definitely teach you what to look for. Biggest thing I was shown (Thanks Mike!) was how to read water properly and break it down. Once you can do that, the river itself really doesn't matter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is never a waste of time to walk a river you are going to fish regularly when the water is about as LOW as it gets... Lots of people only go to a system when they think it will be high and the fishing will be great. If you go when it is low remember to mark spots using shore features, hand held gps or even your cellphone camera.

 

I can't count the number of times we have a bit of a chuckle watching newbies on a trib fishing in all the wrong places because the water is murky as heck and flowing about a foot higher than usual. They come because of high water but they don't know why or what to do... that is a waste of time to me.

 

As mentioned if you can afford a guide use one, or hook up with someone who is familiar with the system. The second one usually requires going a few times to meet up with someone a couple times so they start to show you things even if it isn't intentional.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Investing in a guiding service is never a bad idea. Along with putting you on fish, he'll definitely teach you what to look for. Biggest thing I was shown (Thanks Mike!) was how to read water properly and break it down. Once you can do that, the river itself really doesn't matter.

Ditto (and Ditto!)

 

- in fact, learning to fish the bigger river will help you read the smaller ones; but once you've achieved success on a good-sized river, going back to a smaller river feels like the kiddie rides at the EX, after you just got off "Drop Zone." lol!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...