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captpierre

Kawartha Crappie advice

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Hey Guys. Never targeted crappie before. Now that we have a cottage on Pigeon, will want to do that this spring.

 

I think a small jig a few feet down from a float is what some guys use. What type/colour? What type of water do I look for?

 

Depth? Warm north shore? I think they school. So try a spot. If no action in 5 min move on?

 

Would appreciate any advice.

 

Thanks, Peter

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Yep, you pretty much got it.

 

Find warmer water, cover the north shorlines, look for shallow, dark bottoms. If you get one, stick to that area, there will be more. They could all be in a very small area though, so make sure you don't miss anything. I've caught hundreds of crappies out of an area no bigger than 10x10. If I had of missed taking a cast there, i probably would have been skunked!

 

I like 2" grubs, tubes, and finesse minnows under a float.

 

 

S.

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Thanks Sinker. May not be long. Are they good eating?

 

I can't eat fish, but I've referred to crappie tasting like 'candy'. So I'm guessing they're pretty good :)

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If you can find good size Crappies, then try some Lunker City Fin-S fish with 1/16 oz or 1/8 oz jig head, fish it with or without a float.

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Yep, you pretty much got it.

 

Find warmer water, cover the north shorlines, look for shallow, dark bottoms. If you get one, stick to that area, there will be more. They could all be in a very small area though, so make sure you don't miss anything. I've caught hundreds of crappies out of an area no bigger than 10x10. If I had of missed taking a cast there, i probably would have been skunked!

 

I like 2" grubs, tubes, and finesse minnows under a float.

 

 

S.

 

Great advice here. Especially the 10 x10 area. I have had many trips in the spring where if you where not right on the spot you would get nothing.

 

Don't be afraid of going real shallow either. If it is overcast or there is a good chop on the water...or the water is colored... you can have some real fantastic days in under 3 feet of water

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Solid advice here...

 

Another bait I like to use is an egg sucking leech. They love'm.

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Crappie is one of my favorite go-to fish. Just a little tip, when you talk Crappie, the next word is Slip-Float. Crappie suspend most times, they could be anywhere between bottom and the surface. Casting an area were they could be, you adjust the bobber-stop to the depth were their holding. Micro jigs work great and also a live shiner. Load the line below the bobber with enough split-shot so the bobber will barely float. Let it sit still for a min. then twitch a little winding in slowly letting it sit between twitches. Sometimes a Crappie will barely move the float, thats why all the weight so they don't feel the resistance of the float.

Edited by Fish Farmer

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It's interesting. Does anybody know where the crappie came from? As a kid, never heard of them.

 

Just sunfish, rockbass and perch when it came to panfish.

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PM Sent

 

M :canadian:

 

I hope you didn't give away any of our secrets...I'd hate to put Uncle Vinnie (The Chin) and cousin Guido on your case...

 

 

 

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It's interesting. Does anybody know where the crappie came from? As a kid, never heard of them.

 

Just sunfish, rockbass and perch when it came to panfish.

I'm pretty sure they are a great lakes fish that have finally worked there way into the whole Trent system and other inland lakes. Some were probably planted illegally. I remember catching them in Georgian Bay back in the early 70's.

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Crappies are my favorite fish to eat and catch.....the meat is pure white when cooked....but just treat them kindly after your catch as they are delicate and should either be kept alive in your life well or put on ice in a cooler....DON'T put them on a stringer and let them cook in the sun...the meat will get mushy and fishy...

 

When I had my cottage on Chautauqua Lake years ago the lake was literary teeming with crappies....every bay you could catch hundreds casting without a bobber a 1/16 white bucktail jigs that I tied up myself....the lake no longer produces like it use to and that saddens me....but as Sinker has said, you sometimes have to be on the spot on the spot for any action whatsoever....now I find some of those spots on Chautauqua Lake and have to keep them secret from even my best of fishing buddies.....LOL...but true......the last few years I have been beating this one spot to death as it seems to be the only small 10' spot that produces day in and day out....hoping this season will even be better.

 

 

GOOD LUCK,

Bob

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I found that just after ice out , look for shallow back bays and channels that have a !!BLACK!! bottom are the first place to hit fish. Minnows or minnow imitators are the ticket.

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