Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Radnine

How do you make a Rapala go deeper?

Recommended Posts

As daft as this may sound, I am wondering if there is a preferred way to make a Rapala type lure go deeper.

I have a Cotton Cordell Wally diver that was catching them in 12 FOW two weeks ago and was wondering the best way to use the same lure but in the 25-30 FOW that they should be in this time of year (in a different body of water). And is there a formula or scientific system (meaning will 1/8 oz of weight get me "x" number of feet down)?

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not run a dipsy? Probably the easiest way to do it without permanently messing up the lure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest skeeter99

old trick I use

 

takes some testing to get depth you want

 

is go get some solder from any hardware store (the small diameter is better)

 

wrap the solder around the shank of the hook either treble or single hook

 

cut off when desired amount on and pinch with pliers, bingo you 14 ft rapala depending on solder added can run probably to 25 feet easy

 

 

I mostly use this riggin wacky senkos in either deep water 15 to 20 feet or when a faster fall triggers bites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why not run a dipsy? Probably the easiest way to do it without permanently messing up the lure.

 

Please to be telling me, what is a dipsy?

Jim

 

Edit: I looked up a dipsy at Caballa's. Thanks Bill, that might fit the bill.

What about tying a lure onto a bottom bouncer or something like? Same effect?

Jim

Edited by Radnine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old trick I use

 

takes some testing to get depth you want

 

is go get some solder from any hardware store (the small diameter is better)

 

wrap the solder around the shank of the hook either treble or single hook

 

cut off when desired amount on and pinch with pliers, bingo you 14 ft rapala depending on solder added can run probably to 25 feet easy

 

 

I mostly use this riggin wacky senkos in either deep water 15 to 20 feet or when a faster fall triggers bites

a way i use to get soft plastics to sink faster for bass is rather than using solder i pull the lead out of the center of lead core line same idea though amazing how well it works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snap weights are quick and easy and they come in a variety of different weights so you can add a heavier one to get them deeper. I even add them to the deep divers I have to get them down more. I believe the deapth is for every ounce it adds 1/3 of whatever the running deapth for the lure is. You can find snap weights in most fishing stores. They are not cheap but worth the buy. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ThisPlaceSucks

i haven't used them much for walleye, but when fishing raps for lakers in 30-60 fow, i've used both wire walleye bottom bouncers and 3-way swivels with a pencil lead or bell sinker. i see no reason why this wouldn't be effective with 'eyes as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could also make like a carolina rig? 3 or 4 feet of leader with the lure trailing a slip or egg sinker? small rubber core sinkers, pull out the rubber and crimp to the hook shaft for weight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get a downrigger clip and several lead weights to add to it. You can attach the clip to your line anywhere form 3-10' in front of the lure and add the amount of lead you need to get it down (1/4 oz would probably do it in this situation). The advantage to this system is in landing fish. When you have a fish on , reel in until you ge to the downrigger clip, unclip it from the line, and fight the fish with nothing on the line. This is the system I use for lakers, fishing as deep as 60' with 6lb test line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally , I would only go the dipsey route if I was fishing for suspended fish a ways off the bottom. I've had good luck with a bottom bouncer sinker, looks kinda like a spinner bait without the jig head just a weight in its place and a swivel were the spinner would be, use a 4-5 foot leader off the swivel back to the rapala. Found them relatively snagproof. Or, use a three way swivel and a lighter pound dropper to the old bell sinker and the same 4-5 foot leader back to the rapala. Just adjust acordingly when making contact with bottom.

 

Edit: these guys

 

https://ssl10.securedata.net/gapen/tackle.html

Edited by dave524

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure of the answer to your question but the idea of weighting a floating type lure to make it negatively bouyant seems the wrong route to go. Once it's negative it's gonna keep sinking unless there's something in the body design to give it uplift when moved thru the water column. These lures get their depth thru the down force of the lip vs the buoyancy of the body.

 

Perhaps the best you can accomplish is to find neutral buoyancy for the lure with lead wire or tape (or even just heavier hooks) and then experiment with finding the right depth like you do with countdown lures.

 

I do know that as a diver if I overweighted myself and did nothing to offset that I'd continue to sink.

 

JF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bottom bouncer is a great way to go...just keep a long enough lead of the back of it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well as mentioned above, you could try these: http://www.offshoretackle.com/snapweights.html

Attach them about 50 feet in front of your lure, making it easy to remove them while your fighting your double digit Pickereye.

You could simply get a bigger Rap and run more line behind it! :whistling:

Also, mentioned was Lead Core. Probably the easiest way to reach and maintain a specific depth. ALso, will easily accept a snap weight as well, should you need to reach deeper... and can also be run off in-line or mast based planer boards.

HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Johnny Bass

I know there are suspending strips to add to your lure to turn them from floating to suspending. I would imagine that the added weight of the strips would make them dive deeper. Basically they are lead strips.Give it a shot.

Edited by Johnny Bass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well as mentioned above, you could try these: http://www.offshoretackle.com/snapweights.html

Attach them about 50 feet in front of your lure, making it easy to remove them while your fighting your double digit Pickereye.

You could simply get a bigger Rap and run more line behind it! :whistling:

Also, mentioned was Lead Core. Probably the easiest way to reach and maintain a specific depth. ALso, will easily accept a snap weight as well, should you need to reach deeper... and can also be run off in-line or mast based planer boards.

HH

Those snap weights are good but a cheaper and I think better way to run is use elastic bands instead of the expensive snaps, just loop the weight on the elastic, run out 30'-50' of line put the elastic over the line pull the weight through the loop and tighten it on, when a fish is on simply break the elastic, it slips off the line and fight the fish in the rest of the way. I've had better success using this method on Lake Erie then with conventional snap weights, in the rougher water the elastic ubsorbs the bounce of the heavy lead. Chain bead weights work very good in calm water, use a heavy enough weight so your line runs at a 45' angle off the board line, I find you don't need to put near as much line out to get to the strike zone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canadadue... I can see how elastics would work, but I don't think that I would be inclined to use them in the cooler weather, for example fishing Quinte in the fall. It can get pretty cold out there and from a convenience perspective, I'll go with the snap weights...

Just be sure that when you are buying snap weights, get the appropriate strength as they are colour coded to reflect the tension of the clip. Also, be sure to push the line in the clip all the way to the back of the clip to ensure it stays in position.

Further thought... I can't recall losing a clip in open water, but I can recall losing one having scraped bottom.

HH

Edited by Headhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can attach the elastic faster then the snap weight and when your Buddy, girlfriend or novice fisher reals the snap weight to the tip of the rod and snaps the weight off into the drink bye bye :o:wallbash: . Besides I catch better with the elastics. We all have our methods, what ever works for you, I havn't used traditional snap weights in 10yrs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have in the past, in an effort to secure the snap weight in situations where I am concerned about dragging bottom, I've used a snap swivel, threaded through the snap weight ring, then threading the line through the snap opening and locking it down. This method allows the snap weight to travel down the line, to the lure, should the weight come off the line.

With regard to folks reeling up snap weights and having fall over board... well I haven't had this happen, but I can see how it could! One thing that I know will eliminate this problem, is where you are standing in the boat while reeling in a fish. (You really can't do much but pay attention when reeling in a line with no fish) Typically, when trolling, I get the person who is reeling in a fish, as far towards the front of the boat as possible. Using long rods in tight quarters is a recipe for disaster. Moving the person who's fighting a fish to the front of the boat, opens up the back, allows the rod to do it's work and give the fisher person more control over the fish. With the rod tip high in the air, this allows the net man to remove the snap, with little or no effect on the person fighting the fish. It also allows for easier netting and on topic, should the person reel the snap up to the top of the rod, the snap will land on the boat floor.

This is simply based on my experience... I have nothing against elastics!

HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest gbfisher

you could use a Torpedo....

 

did I just write that out loud.................... :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×