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baitrummer

Winter Boots

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I won't recommend a pair but I'll put some questions out there for you that might steer you in the right direction.

 

Will you be walking a lot in them? 2plus kms at at time, and how often?

Deep snow?

Wet conditions?

How cold?

How ruff is the terrain?

Using snowshoes?

Using snow machine?

 

Maybe at better question would be what are you mostly going to be doing in them?

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I won't recommend a pair but I'll put some questions out there for you that might steer you in the right direction.

 

Will you be walking a lot in them? 2plus kms at at time, and how often?

Deep snow?

Wet conditions?

How cold?

How ruff is the terrain?

Using snowshoes?

Using snow machine?

 

Maybe at better question would be what are you mostly going to be doing in them?

 

Well, basically, I won't be walking long distances. I don't really need them for heavy slush. I will be fishing stationary for long, bank side fishing so I won't be moving much to generate body heat. Sometimes very cold temps. I use foot warmers but they hardly cut it. I won't be stomping through the tundra or anything :canadian:

 

Thanks a lot!

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I've had them for quite some time but I have a pair of high green rubber Nokias that have a removeable felt liner, they are good for slushy condition and around water also fairly warm.

 

Edit: this page show the different models, may want to consider the studs as well, that is new to me.

 

http://www.nokianfootwear.com/

Edited by dave524

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I bought a cheap -40 pair from CT (green with liners) and they were ok. Definitely could use a better pair. Remember your feet are probably done growing, buy a nice pair and be done with it :)

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I don't know how much you're really looking to spend, but the Baffin Impact is one of the best I've seen.

 

They're extremely comfortable and very light. They're rated to -100 so it's a perfect stationary boot. Plus, they're made in Ontario - Stoney Creek.

 

http://lebaron.ca/pdf_files_fall09/footwear/baffin.pdf

 

Thanks for posting the "made in Canada" stuff.

They are definitely the next boot I will be buying.

Jim

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Well, basically, I won't be walking long distances. I don't really need them for heavy slush. I will be fishing stationary for long, bank side fishing so I won't be moving much to generate body heat. Sometimes very cold temps. I use foot warmers but they hardly cut it. I won't be stomping through the tundra or anything :canadian:

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Sounds like you want/need rubber felt lined boots or maybe hip waders. Get them a bit big (you're not walking much) for your warm socks, but don't stuff the boot too much because the space/air inside is what will help keep your feet warm.

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Mickey Mouse boots are the best I have ever owned. You don't need any special socks and most times you won't want to tie them up. When you take your foot out the boot is steaming. The insoles are completely rubber coated so there are no insoles to maintain and your foot is over 1.5" off the ground. Hex screws for traction are not an issue.

 

Put this same post on the Michigan Sportsman site and guaranteed most will say Mickey Mouse boots.

 

US Army boots made for the Arctic conditions and made in Canada by Bata.

 

Warning, make sure the temp is -5 or colder or your feet will be uncomfortably hot.

 

Here is a google link on Mickey Mouse Boots

 

http://www.google.ca/search?q=mickey+mouse...lient=firefox-a

Edited by Vanselena

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don't LOL, but go check out last years line of snowboarding boots. I have a pair of "winter boost good to -80*" and I would much rather wear my old snowboarding boots for many reasons. Comfort, weight, great traction on most and water proof. Just an idea... ;)

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I would go with Sorels...I have a pair that gotta be 25 years old...just buy new felt insoles every few years...boot soles are thick enough to take hex screws for traction on ice...I wear a pair of nylon sox under a pair of wool sox a never have cold feet...remove the insoles after each use to dry them out...

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I have a pair of Irish Setters Gortex/lether with 800g thinsulate, they are the best boots I own. My Dad has the Rocky complete Gortex with 1000g thinsulate, they were or might still be on sale at BPS. I think Fishing World might have them.

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Anyway.....get them large and add a thick insole inside the insulated part so your feet will be even further off the ground.

 

I bought some boots from Walmart (on sale for about 70 dollars) that were rated at -84 F. They look like Baffins and even the outer part has insulation. I usually wear 9 1/2 but I bought size 12 I think. I added a thick insole that is full of holes and keeps my foot further off the ground. I managed to put the insole under the insulated boot that is not felt but feels like polar and is very thick. I fish in -30 C degree temps all the time and I also do a lot of snowmobiling.....never got cold feet. I also wear a good sock and a very thick insulated sock.

 

The boots are quite high (almost to the knee) and the lace on top keeps the snow from entering the boot. The boot has 2 adjustable straps to tighten them at the ankle and a bit higher than the ankle. Walking with these boots is pretty good too but I wouldn't walk for 3 miles in them.

 

The bad news is the fact that I have never seen these boots in Walmart since then.

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