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Just curious ... kayak fishing is becoming hugely popular, and alot of folks are fishing from them. Why are they so much more popular now than fishing from a canoe? How is it any different? You actually have more room and storage in a canoe, and can stand up etc.

 

My next question is, if one were to buy a kayak, what are the advantages/disadvantages between the sit-on-top models and the sit-in models. Again, I'm probably wrong, but I would think that I would or could get wet in the sit-on-top models, which would limit me from wanting to fish out of it on colder days, or early spring or later in the fall.

 

Thanks!

 

Not having tried I can't speak from experience but my buddy fishes from his kayaks often and he says he'd like the idea of a sitontop cuz he's always hanging his feet over the edges either to fend off rocks or just to cool down. He's a wetwader type too, of course.

 

JF

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I don't know from experience.

 

But from looking at peoples pictures...if you were to get a "sit on" kayak the tops are more flat and you can store stuff behind you and in between your legs.

 

Versus a "sit in" kayak the room is limited to the inside diameter of the kayak in front of you...and if your flexible behind you...

 

 

I saw some pictures yesterday of a sit on kayak and the guy had a milk crate with a rod sticking out...more than enough storage for someone like me.

 

 

 

 

 

And the reason people are going for a kayak over canoes because of the weight factor. Most kayaks are much much lighter than a same size canoe.

 

 

Hope this helps!

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Just curious ... kayak fishing is becoming hugely popular, and alot of folks are fishing from them. Why are they so much more popular now than fishing from a canoe?

 

Well, to be perfectly blunt, anybody can jump into a kayak, flail away and generally get the boat to move in the direction they want without flipping over. Canoes, especially higher end performance oriented boats, take quite a bit of skill & coordination that is very hard to learn by yourself. Canoes also feel alot tippier to n00b's at first, which probably scare off alot of people to kayaks. Also there's not alot of solo canoes made or for sale in Canada. That said, a well designed solo canoe is definitely nicer to paddle and performs better than any plastic kayak.

 

Kayaks are significantly cheaper too, but not lighter. A good Kevlar canoe will be less than 50lbs.

 

My next question is, if one were to buy a kayak, what are the advantages/disadvantages between the sit-on-top models and the sit-in models. Again, I'm probably wrong, but I would think that I would or could get wet in the sit-on-top models, which would limit me from wanting to fish out of it on colder days, or early spring or later in the fall.

 

Well you answered your own question, SOT's are better in the summer, SINK's are better for colder water. SINK's are generally faster and less wind sensitive too.

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where are the real "yakkers here" ?

 

I was blessed to have been taken out on a trip last year with one... sit on top.. .what a blast,,,

 

I think I have to go the canoe/tin route though so my daughter can join me too

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'Yak fisher here, although relatively new to it. I bought a sit-in style, not through any belief that it was a better design for fishing but because that's the type I'm familiar with and enjoy paddling. Now that my biases are out of the way...

 

Sit on: A little higher out of the water, can help if you're trying to eyeball structure through the water surface glare (the higher the better). Can offer more comfort - dangle your legs over the sides and relax! Mounting extra gear (rod holders, etc) requires a little more care as any holes drilled will need to be sealed properly. Probably more challenging to mount a fish finder, at least if you're wanting to mount the transducer inside (shoot-through-the-hull). Easier to store and get at your gear for the most part.

 

Sit in: For me, the main advantage is stability. Very low center of gravity, comfortable and easy to control. I drilled holes for a rod holder and fish finder display with no real concern since the holes are nowhere near the waterline and don't impact any seals. I epoxied the fish finder transducer inside on the base and it works very well - will likely require a re-epoxy every couple of seasons, we'll see how it goes. Being able to use a skirt is a definite advantage if you fish in waters that can get choppy. My 'yak weighs 36 pounds (probably more like 46 with anchor and gear inside) which makes it easy to portage with (and put on the roof of the truck.)

 

The best advice I can give is - try both! Find what feels comfortable, and don't limit yourself to "angler" kayaks - anything you need for fishing can be added with a drill and a little care. Unless you're planning on also taking the kayak on multi-day expeditions I'd recommend a shorter model. While the sleek ones are great for paddling long distances, they're not easy to turn. With a shorter style you might not want to paddle as far, but maneuvering around that piece of structure on the bottom will be a whole lot easier.

 

If you're planning on drilling holes, make sure you ask if the material is suitable! I'm pretty sure most 'yak materials are, but better safe than sorry.

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Why a kayak instead of a canoe?

1. Kayaks are much easier to handle solo than a canoe. They are not affected by the wind and are much easier to paddle in rough water. I have taught people to do both, and most folks will never be able to handle a canoe solo in even moderate winds. Most folks can learn to paddle a kayak in even heavy winds in about 15 minutes.

 

2. a SOT kayak is a better fishing platform than a canoe: you are closer to the water, have more seating options, and it's easier to land fish. Recently, a 44" musky was landed from a SOT kayak: try that solo in a canoe!

 

3. trolling is much easier in a kayak. With a good rod holder, you can paddle in pretty much any water/wind condition and easily troll while watching your rod.

 

Kayaks - at least fishing kayaks - are not lighter than canoes for equal length. In fact, that is the downside of a SOT kayak. My 15' fishing kayak weighs 70 lbs outfitted and is an absolute bear to carry anywhere. If I can't get it there on a cart, then I am probably taking a canoe instead. When you start talking weight per paddler, then canoes really shine. 2 paddlers with a nice 30 lb canoe can access lots of backcountry water easier than one person with a 70 lb boat.

 

A quick breakdown of SOT kayaks verser traditional (SIK) boats:

 

1. SOTs are better for fishing: you can carry and access more gear, sit sideways, and land fish easier from a SOT

 

2. SOTs are "wet" boats. They require good clothing to fish in cold weather. SIKs are much drier and allow you to paddle in colder conditions with less cold-weather gear (until you fall in, which is a whole other discussion about kayaking safety)

 

3. Generally, SIKs are higher performance boats for paddling any distance. There are high-performance SOTs, but they are not the norm.

 

Hope this helps. For good information from folks that fish daily out of kayaks, try Yakfisherman.ca. or the Kayak Angler magazine site.

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I've been fishing from a SIK for the last 3 years (I also got a scanoe). If you're using it purely for fishing, then a SOT allows more stability and more gear to carry. The reason I have a SIK is cause I also use it for duck hunting, so I'm out on the lake in November breaking ice, and sometimes have to paddle longer distances.

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I recently purchased at SOT kayak for fishing and you've received some good advice here (the same I received). If you are considering buying one I would strongly suggest you try out a few models first. I was advised of this and am very thankful I did.

 

My SOT is easy to fish out of but you do get wet. One solution to this is to get some waterproof clothing. Personally if it's cold out I just wear my waders when I go out.

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I have SIT tandem Kayak and I enjoy fishing with Kayak. Before I have purchase the Kayak, I usually do fishing on Canoe but I changed to Kayak.

The main reason to change to Kayak is wind. I always go fishing myself but when the wind speed is over 20km/s , I can't control canoe.

 

But Kayak is very fast and good for solo paddling . If you go fishing yourself, I recommend Kayak but for over 2 person, Canoe is better.

 

I have no idea about SOT Kayak but looks nice for fishing.

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well said Singingdog.

If you are looking for a very versatile fishing boat, then consider a sit-on-top kayak in the 13-16' range. They are pretty much limitless for the waterbodies we have here in Ontario. Lots of different models out there in all sorts of price ranges and weights.

My best suggestion is to narrow your search based on all possibilites of fishing you would do, then go out and try free demos of the models in that category.

 

There's a lot of good advice on Yakfisher.net regarding kayaks.

 

Since buying my first kayak, I really only use canoes for backcountry tripping now, but there's really no substitute for that.

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I love canoes personally, but I usually fish with another person. For solo trips a Kayak is much better since it is lighter you can move it easier from the roof of your car.

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i personally have a SIK kayak and i love it keeps me dry can be tight for room sometimes but you learn to take only what you will use. i have demoed SOT kayaks yes you will get a bit wet but when it starts getting cold u just have to dress right and i find them way better then a canoe a lot more stable.

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I find a kayak is much easier to manuever than a canoe. I have a sit in one....the opening on my kayak is very large and can fit all my fishing gear between my legs! I personally would go for a sit in, if you have a sit on kayak and tip you may lose all your gear much easier.

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I find a kayak is much easier to manuever than a canoe. I have a sit in one....the opening on my kayak is very large and can fit all my fishing gear between my legs! I personally would go for a sit in, if you have a sit on kayak and tip you may lose all your gear much easier.

 

Most SOTs are much more stable - less likely to tip - than SIKs. I can sit sideways on my SOT, with my legs in the water, cast, fight and land fish and never even come close to tipping. Many SOTs are stable enough to stand and fish from. Any kayak that tips - SOT or SIK - is going to lose gear that isn't lashed in.

 

timmeh has good advice on cold weather. I wear stocking-foot waders in my SOT from ice-out right into late May.

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Take a look at Native Watercraft's Ultimate kayaks. They are hybrids. Look like a canoe but are paddled like a kayak. You can stand in them and they have more storage than either the SOT or the SIK. I bought the super light weight Tegris edition and it only weighs 30lbs, 36lbs with the seat in.

tegtop.jpg

yakup.jpg

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I was thing of getting a kayak too. But to be honest I am a little scared of the kayaks or canoes abiltiy to work with me...I'm a big boy..an ex-bodybuilder whos muscle has moved to his belly..at 6'2 300 pounds..kayaks and canoes can be intimidating to me..my dad has a canoe we take out now and then but because im so big (my shoulders are wider than the canoe) I have to sit in the bottom with my legs straight out just to keep from falling out and tipping (something we had to experience a few times before we figured out what to do)..after a while this can get pretty uncomfortable. Does anyone know of a fishing kayak with impeccable stabilty that can handle big beefy!

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Ocean Kayak's Big Game is a big man's kayak. PM Crazyhook, he is a Ocean Kayak sponsered pro guide. Or check out Yakfisher.net lots of OFC'ers and other helpful kayak anglers.

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I have never fished out of a yak before but I would say it depends if you fish solo or with a partner. I never fish alone so I prefer a canoe since I can have a partner and some gear. If you get a ultralight kevlar canoe it can weigh as little as 40lbs and great for up to 3 people and some gear.

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