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fishinggeek

How to Charge a Batter

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Sorry about the dumb question, but can someone explain how to charge my boat batteries step-by-step? I couldn't find it on google. It's intimidating because there's a wing nut on each terminal, and a metal post. Do I take off the wing nuts, or just put the clamps on the terminal? Do I do the positive or negative first, or does it matter? I know I'm not that sharp with these things so feel free to laugh at me!

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You attach the clips to the "metal posts" .. it doesn't matter which you connect first. I personally prefer to plug in the charger AFTER connecting it to the battery though.

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Thanks Rich! I have 2 batteries though. I know to charge one at a time, but if I put clamps on the post, will it damage the other battery? I assume they're on the same circuit.

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From what I remember, we used to hook them up while they were still linked in tandem. Can't remember if they charged in tandem or not. But either way it shouldn't cause any damage.

 

(I say we used to cuz I only got the one battery now)

Edited by Rich

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you are not giving enough info to answer your question

are the batteries hooked together for the trolling motor, and is the trolling motor 12 or 24 volts

or is it a trolling motor battery and a starting battery

what kind of charger is it

12 or 24

is it a one bank two bank

Edited by Terry

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ASSUMING they are connected in parallel (+ on one to + on the other, and - on one to - on the other), connect your charger + lead to the + post on one battery and the - lead of the charger to the - of the same battery. it will charge both batteries for you. Connect your charger leads first, then plug in your charger. If the batteries are connected in series (- on one battery to + on the other) you need more help! Let me know!

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ASSUMING they are connected in parallel (+ on one to + on the other, and - on one to - on the other), connect your charger + lead to the + post on one battery and the - lead of the charger to the - of the same battery. it will charge both batteries for you. Connect your charger leads first, then plug in your charger. If the batteries are connected in series (- on one battery to + on the other) you need more help! Let me know!

 

:clapping:

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Thanks everyone (in advance - I'm sure there's more questions). They're 2 Interstate deep cycle batteries hooked up together. Is it bad to charge both at once?

 

I've gotten so much help from the board, but have given so little back. I swear it's only because I have no knowledge!

 

And they are both 12 V.

Edited by fishinggeek

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I guess he wouldn't realize that the power would have to be the entire voltage of both batteries....

 

Like everyone is saying we need more info...

 

 

How many chargers/whats the voltages....

 

and most importantly how are the batteries connected?

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if he takes some of the advise without answering the questions, he could blow his batteries up

because there are many ways batteries can be hooked up in a boat

and no one can give you a good answer with the correct info

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if he takes some of the advise without answering the questions, he could blow his batteries up

because there are many ways batteries can be hooked up in a boat

and no one can give you a good answer with the correct info

 

Best answer so far!

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Thanks. I haven't attached anything yet. They're 2 12V batteries. They're configured exactly like that picture. I have a Canadian Tire Intelligent Charger rated for 12 V. So I can't do it?

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If they are wired like the picture then disconnect the jumper and charge one battery at a time.

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Not... unless he's got a 24V charger...

 

If you charged them long enough would they not charge fully?

Just curious I usualy charge my 4 batteries up on a 12volt linked and leave the whole heap on the trickle charger for storage at the trailer.

When I come up each weekend all the batteries show a full charge?

 

I would assume the 12V does the trick, but maybe takes longer?

No idea...I just know it either works or my battery gage is pooched LOL!

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If you charged them long enough would they not charge fully?

Just curious I usualy charge my 4 batteries up on a 12volt linked and leave the whole heap on the trickle charger for storage at the trailer.

When I come up each weekend all the batteries show a full charge?

 

I would assume the 12V does the trick, but maybe takes longer?

No idea...I just know it either works or my battery gage is pooched LOL!

 

If they are hooked in parallel than it would be fine but they are hooked in series so you end up with 24v

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If they are wired like the picture then disconnect the jumper and charge one battery at a time.

 

Dan, is the jumpber the one with the wing nuts? Any risk of me being shocked?

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I think your best bet is to unhook all the wires from one battery, mark them so you know how to put em back, charge that battery, then unhook the other and charge it. Either that or take it to a dealer and have him tell you how to hook it up.

If you aren't sure, don't mess with it. It could get expensive

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Cost of batteries - $100.00 to $350.00 per battery.

 

Taking pictures of wiring and posting on the internet = free

 

Go to a marina or automotive shop with boat in tow to seek advice = free to $30.00

 

Not knowing how yours are wired up, I would be willing to spend the $30.00. That is still cheaper than the battery charger if you happen to blow that up too.

Edited by Ron

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I have to agree that messing with batteries for someone that has no clue could be DANGEROUS and very expensive........so here's the best advice I can forward to you........get one of these onboard chargers and then you only have to plug it in and you are done. It will charge the batteries and maintain them at all times even through the winter months. Have someone that knows how to install this charger on your boat (not a big job) and all your batteries worries are gone plus it will pay for itself over time because it extends the life of these expensive marine batteries.

 

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/template...&hasJS=true

 

 

Bob

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Get yourself a portable trickle charger that is automatic. The slower you charge, the better it is for your battery. Your batteries will hold the charge longer this way. Make sure you charge your batteries at the end of every outing.

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Get yourself a portable trickle charger that is automatic. The slower you charge, the better it is for your battery. Your batteries will hold the charge longer this way. Make sure you charge your batteries at the end of every outing.

 

Trickle chargers are NOT designed to charge deep cycle batteries. They can cause damage to these very expensive deep cycle batteries. His best charger would be a good onboard marine charger.........not to mention from what I have read he has a 24 volt system in his boat........so that would also be a good reason NOT to use a portable trickle charger.

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Trickle chargers are NOT designed to charge deep cycle batteries. They can cause damage to these very expensive deep cycle batteries. His best charger would be a good onboard marine charger.........not to mention from what I have read he has a 24 volt system in his boat........so that would also be a good reason NOT to use a portable trickle charger.

 

I think I'm going to disagree with you on this one. When I bought my boat it was once owned by an electrician, and he had a 1.5A onboard charger in the boat. I have also read on this board that charging it slowly is best.

 

Can anybody else clarify this?

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