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MARINE PATROLS PROTECTING LAKE NIPIGON FISHERY

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MARINE PATROLS PROTECTING LAKE NIPIGON FISHERY

 

September 29, 2008

 

Anglers Fined $4,600

 

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers have been conducting patrols on Lake Nipigon during the summer in an effort to protect this world class brook trout, lake trout and northern pike fishery from over fishing.

 

Fourteen anglers have been fined $4,600 after Nipigon District conservation officers conducted two overnight marine patrols on Lake Nipigon in late June and early July of this year.

 

Allan Height, 36, of Thunder Bay, who pleaded guilty, was fined $750 for giving false information to an officer, $400 for possessing a brook trout less than 56 cm in length and $200 for transporting the undersized brook trout while operating a charter boat on Lake Nipigon.

 

The following anglers were each fined $250 for angling with a barbed hook.

 

 

-Richard Kydyk, 56, of Hillsburgh, Ontario

-Andrew Connell, 50, of Thunder Bay, Ontario

-Seppo Bjorn, 62, of Thunder Bay, Ontario

-Christopher MacLean, 29, of Thunder Bay, Ontario

-Paul Durand, 40, of Star Prairie, Wisconsin

-Brett Schiefelbein, 36, of Chicago, Illinois

-Allen Schiefelbein, 63, of Hinsdale, Illinois

-Richard Below, 48, of Rice Lake, Wisconsin

-Louis Barrett, 52, of Atikokan, Ontario

-Richard Nichols, 61, of Cameron, Wisconsin

-Cory Pacholke, 34, of Cameron, Wisconsin

-Jonathon Schultz, 47, of Cameron, Wisconsin

-Larry Nichols, 64, of Greenville, Wisconsin

 

 

The hooks and fish were seized and forfeited to the Crown. The fish were donated to charity.

 

Justice of the Peace Marcel Donio heard the cases in the Ontario Court of Justice, Nipigon, on July 28 and September 22, 2008 respectively.

 

Anglers are reminded that Lake Nipigon is a world class brook trout, lake trout and northern pike fishery. Special size and limit restrictions required anglers to release many fish in order to comply with the regulations, which have been in place since 1997.The use of barbless hooks allows fish to be released easily and quickly. The less a fish is handled and the less it is damaged by hooks, the more likely it is to survive.

 

To report a natural resource violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any time or contact your ministry office during regular business hours. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

 

 

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Well they still got off lucky,i think if they were to start taking their fishing gear & boats too,they would not be doing that crap,the MNR should start making examples of these morons !!! :wallbash::angry:

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