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Kirk

500lb Shark Caught

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Its not enough I find the stories...I gotta post pictures as well? LOL

 

I don't have the internet posting skills...but it was on the News today, channel CP24

 

Maybe someone with the technical skills could help me out.

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That picture of the two women and the story are two years old.

There must be a new report.

Sharks are very common in that area. In fact there was a National Geographic special a few weeks ago about this area. I think it was about Arctic Sharks or Ice Sharks...something like that.

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Right place Paul...but that was last year,

 

Looks like another shark was caught this year from the same place...Sauganay (sic) amazing

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so much for Professional courtesy

 

 

 

 

Man Who Wanted To Swim With The Sharks Dies After Being Bitten

Tuesday February 26, 2008

CityNews.ca Staff

 

It doesn't happen often, but when it does, it's always seen as a terrible way to die. An Austrian tourist who always wanted to swim with sharks finally got his chance at living his adventure - and it cost him his life.

 

Markus Groh, a lawyer from Vienna, booked a trip with Scuba Adventures for a chance to swim with the fishes off the Bahamas, little knowing how tragically apt that phrase would become. The company specializes in extreme experiences, which lets clients come "face to face" with sharks.

 

But there are no cages in their arsenal. Instead, they bait the water with bloody fish parts to attract the sharp-teethed creatures and let enthusiasts literally get up close and personal with the underwater predators.

 

That's what the unprotected diver was doing when one of the sharks got a little too close, and wound up biting him on the leg. The crew in the boat sent out to ferry him to his destination fished him out of the water and immediately called the U.S. Coast Guard, which raced to the rescue.

 

Groh was airlifted to a local hospital and while authorities won't reveal the exact injury he sustained, it proved to be a fatal one. He died in the emergency room. It's still not clear what kind of shark was involved, although the company's website claims it specializes in bringing swimmers close to a wide variety of species, including hammerhead and tiger sharks.

 

The firm has so far refused to comment on exactly what happened, but its site points out that there is some risk in taking them up on their most challenging offer. "There will be food in the water at the same time as the divers," it warns. "Please be aware that these are not 'cage' dives, they are open water experiences."

 

Groh was just 49 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

feb2608-shark.jpg

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Terrible when a professional goes out swimming with his fellow sharks and things go wrong.

 

That said... condolences to his family and friends.

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Irony. Must be a new fish to not recognize a colleague when he sees one.

 

Last time I was scuba diving...I came across a shark and turned away...not really into face to face interaction. After turning away from the shark I came across a school of baraccudas....so I went back up to the boat and had lunch. Nobodies ever died eating lunch on a beach.

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That picture of the two women and the story are two years old.

There must be a new report.

Sharks are very common in that area. In fact there was a National Geographic special a few weeks ago about this area. I think it was about Arctic Sharks or Ice Sharks...something like that.

 

Greenland Sharks maybe??

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Last time I was scuba diving...I came across a shark and turned away...not really into face to face interaction. After turning away from the shark I came across a school of baraccudas....so I went back up to the boat and had lunch. Nobodies ever died eating lunch on a beach.

 

 

I second that... actually I would be out of my mind waiting for my partner to come back...

I do feel badly for that man and his family...such a senseless death.

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No Paul...that one was caught a year or two ago.

 

The radio report I heard tonight was that it was in fact a Greenland Shark, and was caught while icefishing. The fisherpersons had to enlarge the hole to land it, took some pics, and stuffed it back in the hole, alive.

 

JF

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I thought that maybe your comma was a typo. "500lb Shark Caught, Ice fishermen in Quebec". Take out the comma and it reads "500lb Shark Caught Ice fishermen in Quebec". I was thinking "Hope Roy's ok"....

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I thought that maybe your comma was a typo. "500lb Shark Caught, Ice fishermen in Quebec". Take out the comma and it reads "500lb Shark Caught Ice fishermen in Quebec". I was thinking "Hope Roy's ok"....

 

LOL, I cant stop laughing....my family are looking at me like Im the village idiot!!!

 

that line is great!!!

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Here's an interesting tid bit I found on Greenland Sharks:

Greenland sharks are deep-water sharks, living at depths up to 2,000 m (6,600 ft). Though famously sluggish—when hunted, they can be dragged out of the water with one's bare hands—they feed on agile prey such as fish, and on mammals like seals.[3] The stomachs of a few Greenland sharks have even been found to contain pieces from reindeer, horses, and even parts of a polar bear. An entire reindeer, minus its antlers, was found in the stomach contents of one Greenland shark. Greenland Sharks are even cannibalistic, eating each other, because they are immune to each other's toxic flesh.

 

This shark frequently has a relationship with a parasitic copepod, Ommatokoita elongata, that attaches itself to the cornea of the eye and feeds on the shark's corneal tissue; the resulting scar tissue leads to partial blindness of the shark. However, this does not occur in all Greenland sharks.[4] Also, studies show the Greenland Shark could probably detect light from darkness. The copepod is a whitish-yellow creature that is said to be bioluminescent and possibly serves the symbiotic function of attracting prey for the shark, like a fishing lure. This is suggested by the fact that these normally sluggish sharks have been found with much faster-moving animals (such as squid) in their stomachs. Biologists know little of its reproduction and life cycle, aside from ovoviviparity; its lifespan may be as long as 200 years.[5],[6]

 

The flesh of a Greenland shark is poisonous when fresh. This is due to the presence of the toxin trimethylamine oxide, which, upon digestion, breaks down into trimethylamine, producing effects similar to extreme drunkenness, occasional sled dogs that end up eating the flesh are unable to stand up due to the neurotoxins. However, it can be eaten if it is boiled in several changes of water or dried or rotted for some months (as by being buried in boreal ground, exposing it to several cycles of freezing and thawing). It is considered a delicacy in Iceland and Greenland.

 

Recently, the Greenland shark has been found within the lower St. Lawrence River, where it swimming in shallow waters for the first time. Since discovered within Quebec, divers have noted that during the female sharks will stay within the lower area of the St. Lawrence, while the male sharks swim farther up to areas where marine life is more abundant. Another notable difference, since being spotted in the St. Lawrence, is the fact that the Shark's eyes are completley clear, with no parasites. One diver has even been noted as saying that the sharks eyes watch and follow the divers as they swim.

 

 

[edit] Inuit legends

The shark's "origin" comes to a legend, refering to an old woman that washed her hair with urine, and the gray cloth she used to dry it blown away after, becoming the first Greenland Shark.

 

The shark is not dangerous to humans, though there are Inuit legends of the fish attacking kayaks. [7]

 

Inuit consider Greenland Sharks a scavenging nuisance.

 

 

[edit] Research

Canadian researcher William Sommers and the organization Greenland Shark and Elasmobranch Education and Research Group (GEERG) have been studying the Greenland shark in the Saguenay Fjord and St. Lawrence Estuary since 2001. The Greenland shark has repeatedly been documented (captured or washed ashore) in the Saguenay since at least 1888. Accidental captures and strandings have also been recorded in the St. Lawrence Estuary for over a century. Current research conducted by GEERG involves the study of the behaviour of the Greenland shark by observing it underwater using scuba and video equipment and by placing acoustic and satellite tags (telemetry) on live specimens.

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LOL shark on the end of my line warrants me cutting the line, muskies do it for me, a pleasant fish.

 

Ya I remeber the thread from a year or two ago, some problem with the lady that caught it? No fishing license or something?

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LOL shark on the end of my line warrants me cutting the line, muskies do it for me, a pleasant fish.

 

Ya I remeber the thread from a year or two ago, some problem with the lady that caught it? No fishing license or something?

 

The piss rag shark was out of season Paul.

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