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Fishnwire

Boneless Pike

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I was once shown, but have forgotten how to clean pike boneless. Can someone direct me to a site with step by step photos which I can print off?

 

Also, any thoughts on what size pike make the best table fare?

 

Thanks.

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I was once shown, but have forgotten how to clean pike boneless. Can someone direct me to a site with step by step photos which I can print off?

 

Also, any thoughts on what size pike make the best table fare?

 

Thanks.

 

I just fillet them as i would any other fish, then cut the strip of "Y" bones out... it's just like removing that strip of bones from behind the rib cage of any other fish... on a pike it's just a longer strip that you have to cut out.

 

25-30 inch fish are prime for eating... you'll get enough meat off of those to make it worth while. you can keep the smaller ones, but you'll find that you don't get a LOT of meat after removing all the bones. And it's generally better to release the bigger fish.

 

hope this helps!

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I like the Five Filet method the best. And agreed, the 25-30 inchers are a nice size.

 

BTW - pike is my favourite of the Ontario game fish, especially through the ice.

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I just fillet them as i would any other fish, then cut the strip of "Y" bones out... it's just like removing that strip of bones from behind the rib cage of any other fish... on a pike it's just a longer strip that you have to cut out.

 

That's what my Father-in-law does, but the result is not BONELESS fish. Perhaps he's doing something wrong...he claims that the bones that are left are easily picked out once cooked. I hate bones in fish though. I try to explain to him that the word "fillet" means ALL BONES REMOVED but he's 75 and stubborn as an old goat.

 

Also, when I clean a bass or walleye, I cut around the rib cage, leaving it still attached to the fish, not the fillet. Can I do that with a pike?

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I like the Five Filet method the best. And agreed, the 25-30 inchers are a nice size.

 

BTW - pike is my favourite of the Ontario game fish, especially through the ice.

 

YES! Now that you mention it, the method I was shown (years ago) yielded five separate fillets. All of which were completely boneless.

 

Anyone know where I can find step-by-step instructions online?

 

*EDIT* Thanks Prairieboy....that looks good.

Edited by bonghitts

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I just found this site. Not free, but the 5 second demo looks pretty cool. B)

 

It's called upzipping a pike.

 

http://www.nobonesaboutit.com/demonorthern.html

 

When I do pike I end up with three pieces per side (top/bottom/tail) but usually end up cutting them into more than five so they fry nice.

 

BTW, I personally think that a 3-4lb pike landed on the ice then filletted boneless rivals any fesh water fish (maybe even the smallest of walleye).

 

Prairieboy

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winter pike is great . just like any fish, take off the fillet. loose the skin.

 

i call mine the 6 fillet method. each full fillet is cut into 3 pcs. the 2 tail portions have no bones so they are exempt.

 

each of the 2 forward pcs. are cut in half following the y's carefully then down thru .

 

i find if care is taken not a lot of flesh is wasted . that hammer i caught today received a surgeons- level filleting.

 

thought he was a bit lean to make the derby but he was tongue -artery hooked and was comin' home either way.

 

check the google . many info sites .

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