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irishfield

Boat all ready for freezing temps..

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Got to thinking about the livewells and power wash pump and realized that even if I blew/vacuumed them out, a trip on the lake would have water finding the pumps/low spots in the hoses and the power wash intake screen/pump filling with water. Fine in most cases when you are on the water...but the trailering home would freeze things and possibly bust things.

 

First I vacuumed/blew out the recir pump in each livewell. Then I removed the intake screens from the transom and attached a 1" rubber hose and a funnel. Turned the bow live well fill pump on and added plumbing antifreeze until it spit out clean into the livewell. Then turned on my power wash and ran it, feeding in more antifreeze, until it came out consistantly pink. Same deal with rear livewell. All the antifreeze that drained out the livewell drains and intakes when I removed the hose was caught in a bucket. This antifreeze was then dumped into the boat hull bilge to take care of that small amount of water that never leaves the hull from rain.

 

I then put the plugs in the livewells and added a bit of antifreeze to each. Mainly the rear one is my concern as it's drain plug level is exactly freeboard water level..so if you leave the plug out it gets a shallow layer of water in it.

 

I then teflon taped the pump inlets and installed 3/4" NPT caps on each of them to keep the water out...I hope.

 

I also filled a 16oz spray bottle with antifreeze. This is for in the boat to spray the rod locker lid seat and bow deck hatches so they don't freeze down from condensation...... that is very heavy in the fall with the water temp higher than the outside temp.

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Edited by irishfield

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You'd be a great dude to buy used stuff from!

Nice job Wayne, looks like you covered all the bases.

Guess we wont be culling our catches at Quinte this year. :lol::lol:

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Mmmmmmmmm, not fillets, we'll steak those hogs!! :lol:

Edited by Dano

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WOW! I just leave everything open...water expands when freezing and heads out the easiest way. Oh well, I guess both ways work! Call me lazy but its worked every year. Then again, I only fish until mid december, not through the nasty cold of january and february

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Just playin it safe Rizzo...took a total of 15 minutes, $6 for the caps and $3.50 worth of antifreeze. No matter what there are low spots in the livewell feed lines that aren't gonna drain completely. If a pump cracks off = boat sunk. The power wash was a $400 item and again if it cracks open = boat sunk. So for $10 (next year will be $3.50!) and 15 minutes of my time...I'll be doin this every year.

Edited by irishfield

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great, now you have me worried! I've been ok all the years I've had boats, but maybe I will just toss a bit of antifreeze in there this year...then again, maybe not

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Thanks Wayne just realized :oops: that I don't have any of the winterizing done on my boat but then again I've never done it until a least December. So I should be good to go unless we get a real good cold snap, then I guess I'll have to teach the son how to do it under my supervision :) jeesh this will be interesting.

 

Cheers

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Great thinking Wayne.

 

I do some what similar..... I always have a bottle of wind shield washer fluid in the truck with me. Once I pull the boat out of the water, I pour some into each live well. I haven't had a problem yet either. Also, I can still use the live well if need be. (makes for a great urinal in the real cold days). :whistling:

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makes for a great urinal in the real cold days

 

I store my lunch in my livewell...Ron, you are never welcome in my boat

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Thanks Wayne, those step by step pics are great. I had the dealer do it the first two years but think I may do it myself this year if time permits.

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Some boats drain well. My glastron livewell was directly above the transom area and all hoses were straight downhill. Other than a bit of water the unit itself held..everything drained on it's own. This one I wasn't gonna take the chance with. The hoses go off the thru hull pumps and then drop a few inches into the hull and one is running ~ 15 feet to the bow..so who knows where all it goes...and the main concern for me was the power wash pump/intake screen chamber/hose/etc.

 

That said, many boats will be fine just pulling them out on the ramp, I just wasn't gonna take the chance with mine. Your mileage my vary!

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It would be less damage than the exhaust from a boat going through the water. All the crap that runs through the storm drains go where? After sewage is treated with a lot nastier stuff than antifreeze where does it go? The water table. This is an old post but I think it is a very useful one. Thanks to irishfield for posting it a couple of years ago. By bringing this post back up you may have helped some people out.

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so that antifreeze just gets pumped into what ever body of water your fishing????? yuk!!!!!....The MOE would love that

 

UMMM it doesn't get pumped into any body of water in my case.. it stays in the boat, hense the capped inlets. Come spring a garden hose gets feed into inlets, pumps turned on and flushed out here in the yard.

 

Maybe stop by the local marinas and see where the RV antifreeze goes... after they launch the boats! Every cruiser gets the antifreeze treatment. It's only alcohol.. it will evaporate.

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UMMM it doesn't get pumped into any body of water in my case.. it stays in the boat, hense the capped inlets. Come spring a garden hose gets feed into inlets, pumps turned on and flushed out here in the yard.

 

Maybe stop by the local marinas and see where the RV antifreeze goes... after they launch the boats! Every cruiser gets the antifreeze treatment. It's only alcohol.. it will evaporate.

 

Cudos to you for flushing it out,Here in St Catharines most boats are flushed out before entering the water in the spring.The MOE was already down there for an antifreeze spill, they were not happy and fortunatly no fines were handed out for the first offence.It's not only alcohol,it's more like glycol and is highly toxic to the enviroment.It may seem like it's really nothing but we should all do our part to keep toxins from being introduced to the enviroment.

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While the Safety Data Sheet is a dry read the use of R.V. Antifreeze is not Highly Toxic and can be diluted and flushed without adverse effects to the environment. The dilution rate of 1 gallon of RV antifreeze diluted to 100 gallons can be consumed however it would taste bad and you will get gastric distress. It is a chemical that can and will prevent costly damage to engines and plumbing systems with a small impact on the environment in large quantities at this time its advantages far exceed its drawbacks. So use it instead of the toxic Antifreeze used in automotive aplications.

 

Art

 

 

SAFETY DATA SHEET

WINTER CARE

RV ANTIFREEZE

SECTION 1 IDENTIFICATION

COMPANY NAME: CHEMICAL SPECIALTIES, INC.

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER: 303-675-0944

TRADE NAME: RV ANTIFREEZE

SECTION 2 INGREDIENTS

Chemical Name/ Common Name CAS # % by Weight TLV Source

Propylene Glycol 57-55-6 40 N/A

De-ionized Water 7732-18-5 60

This document is prepared pursuant to the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29CFR 19101200). In

addition, other substances not “Hazardous” per this OSHA Standard may be listed. Where proprietary

ingredient shows, the identity may be made available as provided in this standard.

SECTION 3 HAZARDS INDENTIFICATION

NFPA RATINGS (Scale 0-4) Health Fire Reactivity Other

0 1 0 N/A

Key: 0-Minimal 1-Slight 2-Moderate 3-Serious 4-Severe

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

Routes of Exposure: Eye Contact, Skin Contact, Inhalation, Ingestion, Signs and Symptoms of Overdose

Eye: May cause minor eye irritation

Skin: No significant adverse effects are expected under anticipated conditions of normal use. Repeated,

prolonged exposure may cause slight flaking, tenderness and softening of skin.

Ingestion: No significant adverse effects are expected under anticipated conditions of normal

use. Excessive ingestions may cause central nervous system effects.

Inhalation: No significant adverse effects are expected under anticipated conditions of normal use. If

effects do occur, refer to FIRST AID section.

Signs and symptoms of Overexposure: Same as above.

Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated By Exposure: Material an/or its emissions may aggravate

preexisting eye disease.

Other Health Information: None

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

SECTION 4 FIRST AID MEASURES

Ensure physician has access to this MSDS.

Eyes: Immediately flush eyes with large amounts of water for 20-30 minutes, lifting lower and upper

lids. Get medical attention as soon as possible. Obtain medical attention if pain, blinking, tears or redness

persist.

Skin: Product is not expected to present a significant skin hazard under anticipated conditions of normal

use.

Inhalation: If overdose by exposure, remove victim to fresh air immediately. Give oxygen or

artificial respiration as needed. Obtain emergency medical attention. Prompt action is essential.

Ingestion: If large quantity is swallowed, give a pint of luke warm water if victim is completely conscious

and alert. If large quantities are consumed, induce vomiting. Obtain emergency medical attention.

SECTION 5 FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

Flammable Properties

Flash Point: 218° F

Flammable or Explosive Limits (approximate % by volume in air) LEL: 2.6 UEL: 12.5

Extinguishing Media: Carbon dioxide, dry chemical, alcohol type foam, water spray, water fog

Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Wear positive pressure, self contained breathing apparatus and other

protective apparatus as warranted. Fight fire from distance or protected location- heat may build up

pressure and rupture closed containers. Liquid may form slippery film. Use water spray of fog for cooling,

solid stream may spread fire as burning liquid will float on water. Avoid frothing/steam explosion. Notify

authorities if liquid enters sewers/public waters.

Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: None known.

SECTION 6 ACCIDETAL RELEASE MEASURES

Steps To Be Taken In Case Material Is Released Or Spilled: Prevent flow to sewers and public waters

as it may contaminate said water. Restrict water usage to prevent slip/fall hazard. Soak up small spills with

inert solids. Dike and recover large land spills. Notify appropriate authorities if product enters any

waterway.

SECTION 7 HANDLING AND STORAGE

Precautions To Be Taken Handling And Storage: Store in tightly closed and properly vented containers,

away from heat, spark, open flame and strong oxidizing agents.

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. READ PRODUCT LABEL

SECTION 8 EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION

Respiratory Protection: No special respiratory protection equipment is recommended under normal

conditions of anticipated use with adequate ventilation.

Ventilation: Adequate general ventilation is required, local exhaust is recommended, if possible

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

SECTION 8 EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION (Continued)

Protective Gloves: Not required

Eye Protection: Chemical splash goggles or full face shield must be worn when possibility exists for eye

contact due to splashing or spraying liquid, airborne particles, or vapor. Contact lenses should not be worn.

Other Protective Equipment: None

Work Practices/Engineering Controls: Keep containers closed when not in use.

Personal Hygiene: If product handling results in skin contact, wash hands and other exposed areas with

mild soap and water before eating, drinking, smoking or using toilet facilities. Promptly remove soiled

clothing and wash thoroughly before reuse.

SECTION 9 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Boiling Point (def F): 370

Freeze Point: Product will not freeze

Specific Gravity (Water=1): 1.01

Vapor Pressure (mm of Hg) @ 20C: <0.1

Vapor Density (air=1): 2.6

Water Solubility: Complete

Evaporation Rate (BuAc=1): Slight

Appearance: Clear, red Liquid

Odor: Slightly viscous, almost odorless liquid

SECTION 10 STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

Stability: Stable

Conditions To Avoid: Heat, sparks, open flame

Materials To Avoid: Strong alkalis, strong oxidizing agents

Hazardous Decomposition or By-Products: Carbon monoxide, and other toxic vapors

Hazardous Ploymerization: Not expected to occur

SECTION 11 DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

Waste Disposal Method: Landfill solids at permitted sites using registered transporters. Burn

concentrated liquids, avoiding flameouts and assuring emissions comply with applicable regulations.

Diluted aqueous waste may biodegrade, but avoid overloading plant biomass and assure effluent

complies with applicable regulations.

Chemical Specialties, Inc., makes no warranty, representation or guarantee as to the accuracy,

sufficiency or completeness of the material set forth herein. It is the user’s responsibility to determine

the safety, toxicity and suitability of his own use, handling and disposal of this product. Since actual

us by others is beyond our control, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by Chemical

Specialties, Inc., as to the effects of such use, the results to be obtained or the safety and toxicity of

this product, nor does Chemical Specialties, Inc. assume liability arising out of the use by others of

this product referred to herein. The data in this MSDS relates only to the specific material designated

herein and does not relate to use in combination with any other material or in any

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and

 

 

Propylene glycol is used:

 

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