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Nemo

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About Nemo

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  1. Thanks for the link about the trappers cabin. Very interesting story.
  2. All the latest news and photos here... http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/news/ice-out.php No back country permits will be issued till May 15th.
  3. Scotty Laketroller Clamp Mount Used them for canoe laker fishing in 30-50' of water in Algonquin Park for years....
  4. I think when they bailed them out the government (provincial and federal) was given GM stock to hold in return. The province and feds eventually sold the stock at a loss but they saved those jobs for another 10 years so many think it was money well spent. The quote below is from the Globe and Mail and the link below provides an excellent overview of the issues and history. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-gm-oshawa-plant-closing-explainer/ General Motors Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in 2009. A multibillion-dollar bailout made the U.S., Canadian and Ontario governments part-owners of the company. More cuts came under the so-called Government Motors era, and thousands more jobs were lost when Oshawa’s consolidated plant was closed. In all, Ottawa gave $7.23-billion to GM, and the province $3.6-billion, and when both governments unloaded their GM shares in 2015, they lost about $3.5-billion on their taxpayer-funded investment.
  5. https://www.ontariofishingforums.com/forum/topic/10376-fishing-in-south-lakeminden-ontario/
  6. Hi just got an email this morning and wanted to track down douG. Glad to see so many names I still remember. douG where is the report . My son did a 6 week canoe trip up there and wants me to go up fishing. Let me know how it went.
  7. Was there any flooding? Here is the link to the advisory. http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/stdprodconsume/groups/lr/@mnr/@emergencymanagement/documents/document/stdprod_100815.pdf
  8. Awesome work. You should be very proud of that event. Kudos to you and all who volunteered and participated.
  9. Here is another great resource for information on Temagami Backcountry.. http://www.ottertooth.com/temagami.htm
  10. Porkpie and Dana thanks for the heads up on the maps. I was looking at the Backroads map it looks pretty good. Dana I will PM you when I get an SD card to load. Thanks Nemo
  11. Got a Garmin Oregon 450 for Father's Day. It seems like a pretty cool tool but the base maps are pretty inadequate so I will need to purchase some maps. Just wondering if any of you had any experience with this GPS and any comments on best maps to buy and in what format. The three maps I am interested in are: TOPO Canada Canada Inland Lakes North America City Navigator Cheers and look forward to your thoughts. Nemo
  12. Interesting.... http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/05/13/hightech_fish_tagging_in_the_toronto_harbour.html High-tech fish tagging in the Toronto HarbourFish in the Toronto Harbour are getting the high tech treatment — acoustic tagging will provide 24/7 detail on fish in the harbour. Text size:IncreaseDecreaseReset Share via EmailPrint Report an Error Save to Mystar CARLOS OSORIO / TORONTO STAR Maxime Veilleux, left, passes a fish to Adam Weir so he can release it. By: Jeff Green News reporter, Published on Mon May 13 2013 EXPLORE THIS STORY 3 PHOTOS 16 COMMENTS Save to Mystar Republish It’s a typical scene for the Night Heron — the research vessel has drawn the attention of the Toronto Police Marine Unit while unloading fish at Polson Pier. “How big?” yells one officer before the water cruiser docks. He hopped aboard Thursday to “inspect” the boat’s livewell, which is full of fish that will be tagged for a five-year study into the microhabitat of nine species in Toronto’s harbour. Picking up an 11-pounder, the officer hands his cellphone to one of six research assistants from Carleton University. “Can you take a photo?” They’re happy to oblige, even if the picture will likely end up as bar stool lie. The finned find, however, may be headed for surgery as one of this year’s 148 fish involved in high-tech acoustic tagging study. PhotosView gallery zoom zoom By the year’s end, 329 fish from nine species will have been tagged, providing location, temperature and depth details 24 hours a day, seven days a week for a full year each. “We want to see where the fish are moving throughout the harbour, see where they’re spawning, see where they’re hanging out for the day, where they hang out at night,” said Rick Portiss, manager, restoration and environmental monitoring with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority. “With that information we can make management decisions on how protect areas and we can also decide where the best fishery is.” A series of 36 receivers positioned throughout the harbour, and two outside the harbour, provide detailed data for the joint study between the TRCA, Carleton’s fish ecology and conservation physiology lab, Aquatic Habitat Toronto and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. On the pier, several fish have are recovering from surgery to implant the device in large bins. A few small stitches on the belly of the fish hide the acoustic transmitter, which takes less than three minutes to insert. The fish are knocked out for the process using a small electric shock. They’re caught with a similar technique called electrofishing — essentially fishing with electric dynamite. “Almost the same thing,” Portiss laughed. “Only the government can do this, so don’t get any ideas.” The Night Heron, their research vessel, is equipped with special rods that drop into the water to provide an electric shock. Stunned fish float to the top where they’re netted into the boat’s livewell. Research assistants collect the species they’re after — northern pike, largemouth bass, white sucker, carp and walleye, among others — and bring them back to shore for surgery. The study, in its third year, is first of its kind in Lake Ontario. Traditional tagging methods only provide a snapshot in time, but the acoustic tagging will give details for not just their regular routines, but how fish handle situations unique to Lake Ontario, like cold water upwells. “Toronto Harbour gets a big pulse of cold water” every so often, said Jon Midwood, post doctorate student from Carleton. The water can change as much as 10 degrees in less than an hour — how the fish handle the sudden change will be part of the lab’s research. Portiss points out that information will have a real impact on how the TRCA manages the harbour.
  13. Thanks Dennis switched to IE and all is good. Nemo
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