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Another fishing conversation,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,numbers


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#1 Misfish

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:30 PM

Things just pop in my head while fishing.  While watching a float slowly drift down the river and keeps floating away and away, my mind wonders.. One thing that really had me wondering this weekend was, how many salmon/trout, make the trek up a river, to only find themselves without a mating partner. Do they have three sums? Serious. Will one male serve two females laying eggs, or two males service one female laying eggs. Are there research numbers on this?

 

I thought this would be something cool to discuss and to know the answer to.

 

Feel free to make your smart ass comments. LOL


Edited by Misfish, 12 September 2017 - 05:30 PM.


#2 manitoubass2

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:12 PM

No idea????

But I know female walleye scatter eggs on the spawning grounds, and males comes in a just shoot sperm everywhere to fertilize as many eggs as possible.

I've never really thought about this with other species.

#3 Fisherman

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:50 PM

Well I think it's a hit and miss like mb2 said, there's no one single point insertion,  spray everywhere to cover the masses.



#4 ketchenany

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:55 PM

Biology 101, the bigger male will fight for a female for dominance, as in any other natural environment. Some will mate with two males to make sure the species progresses. .
Watch National Geographic and it's all over the place, but usually the bigger male wins to have offsprings.
Moose, caribou buffalo and elk sometimes fight to the kill!

Us guys just go for dinner and a movie lol. IN your case a drivein!
Put the gopro in the water and look maybe a three sum.

Art will kill this for sure!!!!



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#5 manitoubass2

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:10 PM

Those are mammals though with,ummmm, parts so to speak.

Fresh water fish have no dingdandingalongs so I think, most if not all do the drop eggs(female), shoot sperm everywhere(male)

But im only the father of seven, what do I know? Lol

#6 ketchenany

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:32 PM

Same thing, Salmon, as in the Fraser BC, they will fight to breed. You are right, no in, but spread! The Jenes.

Different species have different ways to carry on the species.

B is just asking if they do it! Lol he knows they do. That mother catches to many fish so they have to have a three sum! GO get them B.

Seven is good, I had four, all out and doing very well!, but they come back once a week! THey must know the river, lol all good Rick!

#7 JohnBacon

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:45 PM

Biology 101, the bigger male will fight for a female for dominance, as in any other natural environment. Some will mate with two males to make sure the species progresses. .
Watch National Geographic and it's all over the place, but usually the bigger male wins to have offsprings.
Moose, caribou buffalo and elk sometimes fight to the kill!

Us guys just go for dinner and a movie lol. IN your case a drivein!
Put the gopro in the water and look maybe a three sum.

Art will kill this for sure!!!!



.

The bigger males may try to keep the smaller ones away, but they can't really stop other males from sneaking in for a squirt while the female lays her eggs.  So multiple males will fertilize the eggs of a single female; I suspect that those males will also fertilize other females too.

 Interestingly, the jacks are more fertile and can shoot a bigger load than the larger males.  So a quick sneak attack may allow them to fertilize as many eggs as the dominant male that stays with the female.
 
Females have some control too.  They will adjust the rate that they lay eggs based on which males are close by.



#8 manitoubass2

 
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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:07 PM

Same thing, Salmon, as in the Fraser BC, they will fight to breed. You are right, no in, but spread! The Jenes.

Different species have different ways to carry on the species.

B is just asking if they do it! Lol he knows they do. That mother catches to many fish so they have to have a three sum! GO get them B.

Seven is good, I had four, all out and doing very well!, but they come back once a week! THey must know the river, lol all good Rick!


Lol, such a good post!

#9 Old Ironmaker

 
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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:55 AM

I have seen male Smallmouth try and coerce 2 females to lay eggs on his bed at the same time. Then he deposits his "milt" on the eggs.

#10 jeremy84

 
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Posted 13 September 2017 - 11:10 AM

One male can fertilize many females eggs. Hence why, if possible, keep males, release females.





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