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Yammy 115 Timing Belt


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#21 BillM

 
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Posted 12 October 2017 - 08:59 PM

My buddy is a mechanic for the Coast Guard, said the same thing.   Do a visual, if it's fine there's no need to touch it.  It's not like it's got a tensioner or rollers like a car has (Which is usually the part that fails and takes the engine with it) timing belts rarely if ever just snap.



#22 DRIFTER_016

 
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Posted 12 October 2017 - 09:07 PM

My buddy is a mechanic for the Coast Guard, said the same thing.   Do a visual, if it's fine there's no need to touch it.  It's not like it's got a tensioner or rollers like a car has (Which is usually the part that fails and takes the engine with it) timing belts rarely if ever just snap.

 

 

Unless it's in my buddies wife's 1 year old Subaru Outback.

Sitting at a light waiting to turn left. Pop!!!

Engine toast!!!  :wallbash:  :wallbash:  :wallbash:



#23 DanD

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 06:27 AM

I have a 225hp yammy and thought same issue after 5 years, took it to bay city marine who i trust and have had good service, they said only replace of necessary and if not cracked or loose like the majority are save your money and dont replace

 

I'm sorry here guys but that's not the best advice.

If the manufacturer says replace it; it would be foolish not to listen.

 

My buddy is a mechanic for the Coast Guard, said the same thing.   Do a visual, if it's fine there's no need to touch it.  It's not like it's got a tensioner or rollers like a car has (Which is usually the part that fails and takes the engine with it) timing belts rarely if ever just snap.

 

Oh yes it does have a tensioner.

 

31yS71D28IL.jpg

https://www.amazon.c...0_&dpSrc=detail

 

Like the old Fram filter commercial "you can pay me now or you can pay me later" and it's not just the cost of a belt change or the damage to the engine if it breaks. Its you being out on the lake (the opposite end of where you launched) and the belt decides to let go. A timing belt is a glorified rubber band; like anything made of rubber, it never stops curing getting dryer and rotting. Usually a timing belt doesn't break in two; but one of the teeth will rip off and like dominoes will rip off a number more.  That bald spot on the belt comes to the small gear on the crankshaft and the cam(s) stop rotating. Crank has enough inertia that it'll make two or three more rotations. That's when the pistons come up and kiss any open valves. 

So go ahead and throw the dice and not replace the belt; I've seen SOME people win at craps.

One last thing.

If you guys think the cost is to much for this, wait till we follow suit with some European counties. 5 years old tires, regardless of remaining tread; must come off the road. For the exact reason as a stated above; rubber never stops curing. 

 

Dan.



#24 Mister G

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 06:35 AM

 

I'm sorry here guys but that's not the best advice.

If the manufacturer says replace it; it would be foolish not to listen.

 

 

Oh yes it does have a tensioner.

 

31yS71D28IL.jpg

https://www.amazon.c...0_&dpSrc=detail

 

Like the old Fram filter commercial "you can pay me now or you can pay me later" and it's not just the cost of a belt change or the damage to the engine if it breaks. Its you being out on the lake (the opposite end of where you launched) and the belt decides to let go. A timing belt is a glorified rubber band; like anything made of rubber, it never stops curing getting dryer and rotting. Usually a timing belt doesn't break in two; but one of the teeth will rip off and like dominoes will rip off a number more.  That bald spot on the belt comes to the small gear on the crankshaft and the cam(s) stop rotating. Crank has enough inertia that it'll make two or three more rotations. That's when the pistons come up and kiss any open valves. 

So go ahead and throw the dice and not replace the belt; I've seen SOME people win at craps.

One last thing.

If you guys think the cost is to much for this, wait till we follow suit with some European counties. 5 years old tires, regardless of remaining tread; must come off the road. For the exact reason as a stated above; rubber never stops curing. 

 

Dan.

Good advice, but as I said once before 5 years seems like a very short time for a timing belt.....do you know why ? ? ?

 

And the Europeans don't know nothing about tires . . . . LOL



#25 DanD

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 09:08 AM

Good advice, but as I said once before 5 years seems like a very short time for a timing belt.....do you know why ? ? ?

 

And the Europeans don't know nothing about tires . . . . LOL

 

A car's engine on average, is likely only using 30 - 40% of available power. It's not to often you'll need/want to do a full throttle take off. Unless you're 16 and dad can't see you. LOL

So yeah automotive manufacturers measures belt change intervals in mileage (approx 160K Klms) rather then time. 

Boat motor is likely using 80 - 90% of its power most times. We've all likely done this; at the end of a drift, we start the motor; barely let go of the key and we nail the throttle. Running half or better throttle in a chop and the prop comes out of the water. The tachometer pegs its needle; then the next second the prop is back in the water and drags the rpm down just as fast as they went up.

In other words we beat the living crap out of boat motors. I'm surprised at how well they handle these beatings. So the harder we treat/beat on engines/motors the more frequent the service intervals.

 

Dan. 



#26 Mister G

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 09:52 AM

 

A car's engine on average, is likely only using 30 - 40% of available power. It's not to often you'll need/want to do a full throttle take off. Unless you're 16 and dad can't see you. LOL

So yeah automotive manufacturers measures belt change intervals in mileage (approx 160K Klms) rather then time. 

Boat motor is likely using 80 - 90% of its power most times. We've all likely done this; at the end of a drift, we start the motor; barely let go of the key and we nail the throttle. Running half or better throttle in a chop and the prop comes out of the water. The tachometer pegs its needle; then the next second the prop is back in the water and drags the rpm down just as fast as they went up.

In other words we beat the living crap out of boat motors. I'm surprised at how well they handle these beatings. So the harder we treat/beat on engines/motors the more frequent the service intervals.

 

Dan. 

I agree with everything you said, however these northern outboards sit more then they are used. I can see 5 years making sense in the south where the outboard can be used year round but up here it's sleeping most of the time.



#27 DanD

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:06 AM

I agree with everything you said, however these northern outboards sit more then they are used. I can see 5 years making sense in the south where the outboard can be used year round but up here it's sleeping most of the time.

 

Like I also said rubber never stops curing.

Plus the belt sitting idle for long periods of time; the belt will take on the shape that it's sitting in.

If it's an older belt it could fail on the first start up of the season.

 

Dan.


Edited by DanD, 13 October 2017 - 11:07 AM.


#28 Terry

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:15 AM

Agreed I change hundreds of belts on machinery. and a belt that has not been running for months can be worst then one running nonstop

#29 Mister G

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:25 AM

Well there you go captpierre, get that belt changed ASAP or you could be motor shopping soon.

 

#30 DRIFTER_016

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:51 AM

 

Like I also said rubber never stops curing.

Plus the belt sitting idle for long periods of time; the belt will take on the shape that it's sitting in.

If it's an older belt it could fail on the first start up of the season.

 

Dan.

 

 

YUP, same reason you change the water pump impeller regularly.

Also the ozone in the atmosphere deteriorates rubber. 



#31 BillM

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 01:00 PM

 

A car's engine on average, is likely only using 30 - 40% of available power. It's not to often you'll need/want to do a full throttle take off. Unless you're 16 and dad can't see you. LOL

So yeah automotive manufacturers measures belt change intervals in mileage (approx 160K Klms) rather then time. 

Boat motor is likely using 80 - 90% of its power most times. We've all likely done this; at the end of a drift, we start the motor; barely let go of the key and we nail the throttle. Running half or better throttle in a chop and the prop comes out of the water. The tachometer pegs its needle; then the next second the prop is back in the water and drags the rpm down just as fast as they went up.

In other words we beat the living crap out of boat motors. I'm surprised at how well they handle these beatings. So the harder we treat/beat on engines/motors the more frequent the service intervals.

 

Dan. 

 

Thanks for the correction on the tensioner Dan.



#32 Old Ironmaker

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 02:15 PM

I have a 225hp yammy and thought same issue after 5 years, took it to bay city marine who i trust and have had good service, they said only replace of necessary and if not cracked or loose like the majority are save your money and dont replace


If necessary may be too late.

#33 Old Ironmaker

 
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Posted 13 October 2017 - 02:20 PM

A car's engine on average, is likely only using 30 - 40% of available power. It's not to often you'll need/want to do a full throttle take off. Unless you're 16 and dad can't see you. LOL

 
Dan.
[/quote]

Not just Dad's husbands too Dan. She doesn't even deny full throttle take offs as I am sitting in the seat right next to her. She says she loves the smell of rubber in the morning. Nissans 300 HP 3.8L in a mid size family sedan Altima, crazy, my 78' Vett didn't have 300 horse.

Dan I certainly won't tell her but how do we get the other 60% of available power out of our vehicles?

I shook my head the other day when we were car shopping. Tia asks the sales guy, " How many horse are we talking and what foot pounds torque?" Danica Patrick has nothing on her.
[/quote]
[/quote]


Edited by Old Ironmaker, 13 October 2017 - 02:26 PM.


#34 DanD

 
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Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:06 AM

OI.
Just drive the car like it were a boat. The throttle only has two positions.
Idle and wide open ZOOM ZOOM
LOL

Dan





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